Cancer

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  • In patients using drugs to prevent breast cancer recurrence, acupuncture helps cut fatigue, anxiety and depression

    Breast Cancer News From Medical News Today
    1 Aug 2014 | 1:00 am
    Use of electroacupuncture (EA) - a form of acupuncture where a small electric current is passed between pairs of acupuncture needles - produces significant improvements in fatigue, anxiety and...
  • 'Rewired' mice show signs of longer lives with fewer age-related illnesses

    Cancer News -- ScienceDaily
    31 Jul 2014 | 11:58 am
    While developing a new cancer drug, researchers discovered that mice lacking a specific protein live longer lives with fewer age-related illnesses. The mice, which lack the TRAP-1 protein, demonstrated less age related tissue degeneration, obesity, and spontaneous tumor formation when compared to normal mice. Their findings could change how scientists view the metabolic networks within cells.
  • New report shows cancer one of the leading causes of alcohol-related deaths in Australia

    Cancer / Oncology News From Medical News Today
    1 Aug 2014 | 2:00 am
    A new report showing that cancer was one of the leading causes of alcohol-related deaths in Australia should help raise public awareness of alcohol as a significant cancer risk factor, Cancer...
  • Total darkness at night key to success of breast cancer therapy, study shows

    Breast Cancer News -- ScienceDaily
    25 Jul 2014 | 5:04 am
    Exposure to light at night, which shuts off nighttime production of the hormone melatonin, renders breast cancer completely resistant to tamoxifen, a widely used breast cancer drug, says a new study. Melatonin by itself delayed the formation of tumors and significantly slowed their growth, researchers report, but tamoxifen caused a dramatic regression of tumors in animals with either high nighttime levels of melatonin during complete darkness or those receiving melatonin supplementation during dim light at night exposure.
  • Gulf Oil Spill Researcher: Bacteria Ate Some Toxins, But Worst Remain

    Biocompare Cancer
    1 Aug 2014 | 6:31 am
    TALLAHASSEE, Fla. - A Florida State University researcher found that bacteria in the Gulf of Mexico consumed many of the toxic components of the oil released during the Deepwater Horizon spill in the months after the spill, but not the most toxic contaminants.
 
 
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    Breast Cancer News -- ScienceDaily

  • Total darkness at night key to success of breast cancer therapy, study shows

    25 Jul 2014 | 5:04 am
    Exposure to light at night, which shuts off nighttime production of the hormone melatonin, renders breast cancer completely resistant to tamoxifen, a widely used breast cancer drug, says a new study. Melatonin by itself delayed the formation of tumors and significantly slowed their growth, researchers report, but tamoxifen caused a dramatic regression of tumors in animals with either high nighttime levels of melatonin during complete darkness or those receiving melatonin supplementation during dim light at night exposure.
  • Metastatic brain tumor treatment could be on the horizon with use of SapC-DOPS

    24 Jul 2014 | 8:25 am
    A new study has provided hope that previously studied SapC-DOPS could be used for treatment of brain cancer that has spread. "These results support the potential of SapC-DOPS for the diagnosis and therapy of primary and metastatic brain tumors which is critically needed to increase survival rates of patients with this illness,” one researcher said.
  • Genes found to be linked to breast cancer in East Asian women

    23 Jul 2014 | 8:11 am
    A new study in East Asian women has identified three genetic changes linked to an increased risk of breast cancer. While breast cancer is one of the most common malignancies among women worldwide, most studies of the genetic risk factors for the disease have focused on women of European ancestry.
  • Genetic cause of common breast tumors found

    20 Jul 2014 | 5:43 pm
    A major breakthrough in understanding the molecular basis of fibroadenoma, one of the most common breast tumors diagnosed in women, has been made by a multidisciplinary team of scientists. The team used advanced DNA sequencing technologies to identify a critical gene called MED12 that was repeatedly disrupted in nearly 60 percent of fibroadenoma cases.
  • Targets for immunotherapy in early-stage breast cancer

    18 Jul 2014 | 10:15 am
    A new molecular analysis tool has been used to detect the level of an important target for immunotherapy in early-stage breast cancers, researchers report. The diagnostic test, using RNAScope, measures the amount of PD-L1 mRNA in cancer tissues and is devoid of many of the technical issues that plague antibody-based detection methods that have yielded conflicting results in the past. PD-L1 is the target of several novel immune stimulatory therapies in clinical trials.
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    Biocompare Cancer

  • Gulf Oil Spill Researcher: Bacteria Ate Some Toxins, But Worst Remain

    1 Aug 2014 | 6:31 am
    TALLAHASSEE, Fla. - A Florida State University researcher found that bacteria in the Gulf of Mexico consumed many of the toxic components of the oil released during the Deepwater Horizon spill in the months after the spill, but not the most toxic contaminants.
  • Molecular Gate That Could Keep Cancer Cells Locked Up

    1 Aug 2014 | 5:50 am
    In a study published today in Genes & Development, Dr Christian Speck from the MRC Clinical Sciences Centre's DNA Replication group, in collaboration with Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), New York, reveal the intricate mechanisms involved in the enzyme that governs DNA duplication during cell division. By developing a sophisticated system using synthetic, chemical and structural biology approaches, the study reveals how a key enzyme involved in duplicating genetic information embraces DNA through a gated system, which opens up at precise positions allowing for a highly regulated…
  • Master HSF Supports Reprogramming Of Normal Cells To Enable Tumor Growth And Metastasi

    31 Jul 2014 | 10:21 pm
    CAMBRIDGE, Mass. (July 31, 2014) - Long associated with enabling the proliferation of cancer cells, the ancient cellular survival response regulated by Heat-Shock Factor 1 (HSF1) can also turn neighboring cells in their environment into co-conspirators that support malignant progression and metastasis.
  • Drug Target Identified For Common Childhood Blood Cancer

    31 Jul 2014 | 9:50 pm
    In what is believed to be the largest genetic analysis of what triggers and propels progression of tumor growth in a common childhood blood cancer, researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center report that they have identified a possible new drug target for treating the disease.
  • U-M Researchers Find Protein That Fuels Repair Of Treatment-Resistant Cancer Cells

    31 Jul 2014 | 9:48 pm
    ANN ARBOR-Imagine you're fighting for your life but no matter how hard you hit, your opponent won't go down.
 
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    MD Anderson Cancer Center - News Releases

  • Same cancer, different time zone

    30 Jul 2014 | 11:16 am
    Just as no two people possess the same genetic makeup, a recent study has shown that no two single tumor cells in breast cancer patients have an identical genome.In fact, depending on the tumor cell, they grow at dramatically different speeds, according to a study led by Nicholas Navin,  Ph.D.
  • "Father of Tamoxifen" to Join MD Anderson

    21 Jul 2014 | 5:14 am
    The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center is pleased to announce that one of the world's preeminent experts in breast cancer research and treatment, V. Craig Jordan, Ph.D., will join the institution's efforts to end cancer.  Jordan is considered the "Father of Tamoxifen," the groundbreaking therapeutic drug that has saved countless lives. 
  • MD Anderson Ranked #2 in Annual U.S. News & World Report Survey

    14 Jul 2014 | 3:00 pm
    According to the annual "Best Hospitals" survey conducted by U.S. News & World Report, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center is ranked No. 2 in cancer care this year.
  • Study finds diagnosing physicians influence treatment decisions for prostate cancer patients

    14 Jul 2014 | 11:48 am
    New research from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center is shedding light on the important role a diagnosing urologist plays in whether older men with low-risk prostate cancer receive treatment for their disease, and if so, the type of treatment they receive as a result.
  • MD Anderson researchers discover new route for ovarian cancer spread

    14 Jul 2014 | 11:46 am
    Circulating tumor cells spread ovarian cancer through the bloodstream, homing in on a sheath of abdominal fatty tissue where it can grow and metastasize to other organs, scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center report in Cancer Cell.
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    Prostate Cancer News -- ScienceDaily

  • New, accurate epigenetic test could eliminate unnecessary repeat biopsies for prostate cancer

    21 Jul 2014 | 9:37 am
    More than one million prostate biopsies are performed each year in the U.S., including many repeat biopsies for fear of cancer missed. Therefore there is a need to develop diagnostic tests that will help avoid unnecessary repeat biopsies. Two independent trials have now validated the performance of an epigenetic test that could provide physicians with a better tool to help eliminate unnecessary repeat prostate biopsies, report investigators.
  • New prostate cancer blood test now available in the U.S.

    21 Jul 2014 | 9:23 am
    A global leader in prostate cancer diagnostics announces national availability of the Prostate Health Index (phi), a simple, non-invasive blood test that is three times more specific in detecting prostate cancer than PSA (prostate-specific antigen). The new test’s accuracy decreases the need for many men who test positive for elevated PSA levels to undergo a biopsy in order to achieve a reliable diagnosis.
  • Robot-assisted surgery for prostate cancer controls the disease for 10 years

    16 Jul 2014 | 12:11 pm
    Robot-assisted surgery to remove cancerous prostate glands is effective in controlling the disease for 10 years, according to a new study. The study also suggested that traditional methods of measuring the severity and possible spread of the cancer together with molecular techniques might, with further research, help to create personalized, cost-effective treatment regimens for prostate cancer patients who undergo the surgical procedure.
  • Prostate cancer in young men: More frequent, more aggressive?

    15 Jul 2014 | 1:59 pm
    The number of younger men diagnosed with prostate cancer has increased nearly 6-fold in the last 20 years, and the disease is more likely to be aggressive in these younger men, according to a new analysis. Typically, prostate cancer occurs more frequently as men age into their 70s or 80s. However, the researchers found that when prostate cancer strikes at a younger age, it's likely because the tumor is growing quickly.
  • Diagnosing physicians influence treatment decisions for prostate cancer patients, study finds

    14 Jul 2014 | 3:19 pm
    New research is shedding light on the important role a diagnosing urologist plays in whether older men with low-risk prostate cancer receive treatment for their disease, and if so, the type of treatment they receive as a result. The study sought to examine why active surveillance, a management program for low-risk disease, which includes repeat PSAs, prostate exams and biopsies, is underused in this patient population.
 
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    Lung Cancer News -- ScienceDaily

  • Making cancer glow to improve surgical outcomes

    29 Jul 2014 | 12:29 pm
    The best way to cure most cases of cancer is to surgically remove the tumor. The Achilles heel of this approach, however, is that the surgeon may fail to extract the entire tumor, leading to a local recurrence. With a new technique, researchers have established a new strategy to help surgeons see the entire tumor in the patient, increasing the likelihood of a positive outcome.
  • Irreversible inhibitor for KRAS gene mutation involved in lung, colon, and pancreatic cancers

    28 Jul 2014 | 12:36 pm
    Cancer researchers have found a molecule that selectively and irreversibly interferes with the activity of a mutated cancer gene common in 30 percent of tumors.
  • New drug target can break down cancer's barrier against treatment

    27 Jul 2014 | 1:56 pm
    Targeting a molecule in blood vessels can make cancer therapy significantly more effective, according to research. Researchers have found that a molecule, called focal adhesion kinase (FAK), signals the body to repair itself after chemotherapy or radiotherapy, which kill cancer cells by damaging DNA. When the researchers removed FAK from blood vessels that grew in melanoma or lung cancer models, both chemotherapy and radiation therapies were far more effective in killing the tumors.
  • Metastatic brain tumor treatment could be on the horizon with use of SapC-DOPS

    24 Jul 2014 | 8:25 am
    A new study has provided hope that previously studied SapC-DOPS could be used for treatment of brain cancer that has spread. "These results support the potential of SapC-DOPS for the diagnosis and therapy of primary and metastatic brain tumors which is critically needed to increase survival rates of patients with this illness,” one researcher said.
  • ROS1 gene fusions are found in 2.4 percent of Asian patients with lung adenocarcinoma

    21 Jul 2014 | 10:20 am
    ROS1 fusion genes were successfully detected independent of gender or smoking history in young East Asian patients with lung adenocarcinoma, a histological subgroup in non-small cell lung cancer, using multiplex reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry diagnostic tests.
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    Colon Cancer News -- ScienceDaily

  • Genetics of cancer: Non-coding DNA can finally be decoded

    23 Jul 2014 | 10:14 am
    Cancer is a disease of the genome resulting from a combination of genetic modifications, or mutations. We inherit from our parents strong or weak predispositions to developing certain kinds of cancer; in addition, we also accumulate new mutations in our cells throughout our lifetime. Although the genetic origins of cancers have been studied for a long time, researchers were not able to measure the role of non-coding regions of the genome until now.
  • 'Signatures' of genetic mutations in colorectal cancer: Discovery may advance diagnosis, treatment

    22 Jul 2014 | 6:17 am
    A research team has identified protein 'signatures' of genetic mutations that drive colorectal cancer, the nation's second leading cause of cancer deaths after lung cancer. The technological tour de force is described as the first integrated "proteogenomic" characterization of human cancer, "will enable new advances" in diagnosing and treating the disease, the scientists concluded.
  • Gut microbes turn carbs into colorectal cancer, study shows

    17 Jul 2014 | 9:48 am
    Colorectal cancer has been linked to carbohydrate-rich western diets, but the underlying mechanisms have been unclear. A new study shows that gut microbes metabolize carbohydrates in the diet, causing intestinal cells to proliferate and form tumors in mice that are genetically predisposed to colorectal cancer. Treatment with antibiotics or a low-carbohydrate diet significantly reduced tumors in these mice, suggesting that these easy interventions could prevent a common type of colorectal cancer in humans.
  • Possible pathway for inhibiting liver, colon cancer found

    8 Jul 2014 | 8:12 am
    The structure of a protein complex involved in liver and colon cancers has been revealed by an international team of researchers. This structural data discovery opens up additional research opportunities into drugs that can act on the binding of these proteins, thereby possibly inhibiting cancer cell growth.
  • People with HIV with early-stage cancers are up to four times more likely to go untreated for cancer

    30 Jun 2014 | 1:39 pm
    People with HIV who are diagnosed with cancer are two to four times more likely to go untreated for their cancer compared to uninfected cancer patients, according to a new, large retrospective study. Life expectancy for HIV-infected people is now similar to uninfected people, but survival for HIV patients who develop cancer is not. While many studies have attempted to understand why HIV-infected cancer patients have worse outcomes, the new study examined differences in cancer treatment as one potential explanation.
 
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    EurekAlert! - Cancer

  • Recent use of some birth control pills may increase breast cancer risk

    31 Jul 2014 | 9:00 pm
    (American Association for Cancer Research) Women who recently used birth control pills containing high-dose estrogen and a few other formulations had an increased risk for breast cancer, whereas women using some other formulations did not, according to data published in Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.
  • Taking the guesswork out of cancer therapy

    31 Jul 2014 | 9:00 pm
    (Biomedical Sciences Institutes (BMSI)) Researchers and doctors at A*STAR's Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology, Singapore General Hospital and National Cancer Centre Singapore have co-developed the first molecular test kit that can predict treatment and survival outcomes in kidney cancer patients. This breakthrough was recently reported in European Urology, the world's top urology journal.
  • Transplantation shown to be highly effective in treating immune deficiency in children

    30 Jul 2014 | 9:00 pm
    (Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center) Babies who are born with severe combined immunodeficiency can be successfully treated with a transplant of blood-forming stem cells, according to experts led by Memorial Sloan Kettering's Richard J. O'Reilly, M.D.
  • 'Rewired' mice show signs of longer lives with fewer age-related illnesses

    30 Jul 2014 | 9:00 pm
    (The Wistar Institute) While developing a new cancer drug, researchers at The Wistar Institute discovered that mice lacking a specific protein live longer lives with fewer age-related illnesses. The mice, which lack the TRAP-1 protein, demonstrated less age related tissue degeneration, obesity, and spontaneous tumor formation when compared to normal mice. Their findings could change how scientists view the metabolic networks within cells.
  • Sustained efficacy, immunogenicity, and safety for GlaxoSmithKline's HPV vaccine

    30 Jul 2014 | 9:00 pm
    (Landes Bioscience) A long-term follow-up study shows the sustained efficacy, immunogenicity and safety of GlaxoSmithKline's human papillomavirus vaccine Cervarix. Women vaccinated with the vaccine were followed for more than nine years, and vaccine efficacy against incident infection was 100 percent. This is the longest follow-up report for a licensed human papillomavirus vaccine.
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    Cancer Treatment

  • Heebee jeebees!!!!

    Carolines Breast Cancer Blog
    31 Jul 2014 | 3:20 am
    Do you ever wonder about new cancer treatments and their potential side effects? As medical research capabilities advance, so do the weird things they do to our bodies. Surgery used to be where they cut you open and take out the bad things. Now they leave little markers behind or radiate you (intraoperative radiation) while you are sleeping.read more
  • Not a practical option

    Carolines Breast Cancer Blog
    30 Jul 2014 | 3:30 am
    Earlier this week, or maybe it was last week, I saw several articles on this new intraoperative radiation for breast cancer. This is when a radioactive probe is inserted into the breast during surgery and allows the patient to skip traditional radiation. Of course, they may still need chemotherapy and other treatments.read more
  • Talking and working out

    Carolines Breast Cancer Blog
    29 Jul 2014 | 3:47 am
    Yesterday afternoon at the gym, I got to talking to two other women (this is a common occurrence to stop and chat) on the topic of getting into shape/staying in shape while dealing with ailments. One woman is just done with chemotherapy again for chronic recurrent ovarian cancer and is new to the gym. The other woman has osteoarthritis among other problems and has belonged for five years or so.read more
  • Getting even or driving your doctor crazy

    Carolines Breast Cancer Blog
    28 Jul 2014 | 4:22 am
    We all try to be a good patient. We try to eat better foods, less red meat more chicken and fish, get 8 hours of sleep, drink less, brush our teeth, floss, yadayadayada...Huffington Post conveniently posted a list of 9 things that drive your doctor crazy:read more
  • I Have a Shovel

    Southern Hoffs
    27 Jul 2014 | 2:39 pm
    read more
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    cancerhawk

  • FREE Running Program for Cancer Survivors in MD, DC, VA, NY & Chicago

    Robyn
    15 Jul 2014 | 6:46 pm
    Andy & Alan @ Rockville Rotary Twilighter 8K Runfest 1992   Pictured above is my husband Alan (on the right) with his childhood friend Andy.  Since this picture was taken, Andy has run more than 30 marathons, completed 13 triathlons and has become a certified running coach.  Despite all these accomplishments, Andy always made time to go for a run or walk with Alan, even after he was diagnosed with cancer.   It was no surprise to me that Andy connected with The Ulman Cancer Fund’s CANCER to 5K Training Program - a FREE 12-week training program designed to introduce…
  • Financial Assistance from Walk In My Shoes Cancer Foundation

    Robyn
    11 Jul 2014 | 11:23 am
      Image credit: richcat / 123RF Stock Photo   If you’ve been diagnosed with cancer and are having a hard time making ends meet, check out the Walk In My Shoes Foundation. Walk In My Shoes Foundation assists cancer patients with paying rent, mortgages, utility bills, medication, purchasing gas cards, buying groceries, etc.  To qualify for assistance, which is based on availability, the following guidelines have been set: Only patients undergoing cancer treatment are eligible for assistance. Only bills in patient’s name are eligible for payment. Maximum assistance…
  • All Hail Kale & This Yummy Salad Recipe

    Robyn
    8 Jul 2014 | 9:26 am
    Natural Health Magazine   Eating healthy, good-for-you foods during and post-treatment can help cancer patients feel better and stay stronger.  Proper nutrition can help them keep up their body weight and strength, keep body tissue healthy, and fight infection.   Dark leafy greens are the rockstars of the produce department as they have the most concentrated source of nutrition we have.  Kale is a nutritional powerhouse.  Calorie for calorie, kale has more iron than beef and more calcium than milk.  Kale is also loaded with vitamin K.  According to a study in the American…
  • The 4 Stages of Mesothelioma & Their Treatment Options

    Robyn
    7 Jul 2014 | 9:00 am
    Meet GUEST BLOGGER Michelle Whitmer.  Michelle has been a medical writer and editor for The Mesothelioma Center since 2008. Focused on the benefits of natural and holistic medicine for cancer patients, Michelle is a certified yoga instructor and earned her B.A. in Environmental Studies from Rollins College in Florida. Accurately diagnosing a mesothelioma patient’s stage of cancer development is essential to getting appropriate treatment. The stages of mesothelioma are determined by the degree of tumor growth and spread. Stage I represents minimal tumor growth and stage IV indicates…
  • Personalizing YOUR Cancer Treatment (part 4): Do you know your cancer biomarkers?

    Robyn
    24 Jun 2014 | 5:45 am
    In the near future, instead of saying, “I have breast cancer,” a patient will say something like , “I have a HER2-positive carcinoma with a KRAS mutation.”  Cancer will be defined by it’s own unique molecular profile and biomarkers rather than the body part where it originated. To learn more about the dozens of biomarkers already being used to guide cancer treatment, check out the table below. Please note: there are thousands of known biomarkers without currently known effectiveness or relevance to cancer care. This table only represents the biomarkers that are currently…
 
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    Cancerwise | Cancer blog from MD Anderson Cancer Center

  • How I learned to find peace in times of uncertainty

    Cancerwise Blogger
    1 Aug 2014 | 5:30 am
    By Cindy McConkey CoxHome really is where the heart is, and my heart is here in Knoxville, with my sweet hubby and all of my family and friends.Still, as I prepared to celebrate the end of my proton therapy treatment for bile duct cancer, I was thankful for my time in Houston. For the hope of healing and health that that proton therapy has given me, and for the professional care provided by the MD Anderson staff since my bile duct cancer diagnosis. And I do mean care -- these people truly do care. From Rose and Adele, who worked my insurance appeals, to Deloris at the front desk and the…
  • My stem cell transplant, my rebirth

    Cancerwise Blogger
    31 Jul 2014 | 5:35 am
    By Harley Hudson I decided to keep a diary of my stem cell transplant experience so it might help others in preparing for their stem cell transplants. Here are the first two entries. Day 0, 5:16 a.m.: The day of my stem cell transplantThat's right. Day 0. The day my family and I have been anticipating for over 465 days, since last March. And, oh what a day it is: my rebirthday, the day of my stem cell transplant, perhaps the most important part of my chronic lymphocyctic leukemia (CLL) treatment. Somewhere in the U.S., a young man is in a collection center donating his O+ stem cells, which…
  • Young proton therapy warrior's legacy of giving continues

    Cancerwise Blogger
    30 Jul 2014 | 5:31 am
    By Lenzie Davis After being diagnosed with brain cancer, our son, Jaxon, spent his 4th birthday at the MD Anderson Proton Therapy Center.  Our world had changed just a few months earlier when Jaxon began having seizures. When doctors found a cancerous tumor, we researched treatment options and discovered proton therapy would be the best for Jaxon. Jaxon's cancer journeyJaxon spent his time at the Proton Therapy Center wearing a smile, riding a tricycle around the waiting room, or making wishes in the fountain. After Jaxon hit the gong to mark his last day of proton therapy treatment, we…
  • Why I chose MD Anderson for breast cancer treatment

    Cancerwise Blogger
    29 Jul 2014 | 5:30 am
    By Helen Vollmer When I was diagnosed with stage I breast cancer almost a year ago, I went through all the standard emotions: disbelief, anger, fear and utter confusion. As someone in perfect health, according to my charts, I was suddenly confronted with something beyond my control. No matter what I did, I still had cancer, and there were no guarantees that I would be cured.Deciding where to go for breast cancer treatmentAfter the initial shock of the diagnosis lifted, I knew that I needed to act. Where to start? An oncologist? A surgeon? Was it more important where they had studied, what…
  • 5 ways to make cancer treatment more fun

    Cancerwise Blogger
    28 Jul 2014 | 5:38 am
    By Ashley Lauen    My husband, Marshall, was diagnosed with stage 2B Hodgkin's lymphoma about a year-and-a-half ago. Through our lymphoma treatment journey, we spent a lot of time at MD Anderson. My mom has always taught me to "make fun" wherever I am, so to encourage my husband and try to maintain some sense of normalcy, I am always dreaming up ways to make the hospital more enjoyable. After all, we are fighting for his life, not just a clean PET scan. Here are five ways we made the hospital more fun: Host dance parties. Yes, these dance parties will involve an IV tree, but…
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    Mesothelioma News Center | Latest in Asbestos & Mesothelioma News

  • Simple, New Blood Test Could Lead to Earlier Mesothelioma Treatment

    Tim Povtak
    31 Jul 2014 | 11:28 am
    A new blood test developed in Japan is raising hopes it can more accurately diagnose mesothelioma, leading to earlier cancer treatment and improved chances of survival. The test involves a protein biomarker in the blood called N-ERC/mesothelin and a new enzyme-linked system for detecting it. This biomarker is overly expressed in patients with the asbestos-related cancer. Researchers reported their test was 95 percent accurate in identifying cases of the disease and 76 percent accurate in ruling it out. Both are higher percentages than previously reported with other blood tests. Most experts…
  • Talc Pleurodesis vs. Partial Pleurectomy: British Researchers Cite Mixed Results

    Tim Povtak
    30 Jul 2014 | 2:54 pm
    There is no long-term survival advantage to the more-complex, video-assisted thoracoscopic partial pleurectomy (VATPP), but it can offer a significant quality-of-life improvement over the less-invasive talc pleurodesis, according to a recent study of mesothelioma patients in the United Kingdom. Both can alleviate fluid buildup between the lungs and the thin lining surrounding them, a common problem with pleural mesothelioma, creating a debate over which procedure is more appropriate. The study showed the talc pleurodesis (which contains a solution of hydrated magnesium silicate and varying…
  • Mesothelioma Clinical Trial Should Prove Worth of Photodynamic Therapy

    Tim Povtak
    18 Jul 2014 | 8:44 am
    Eli Glatstein, M.D., has touted the benefits of photodynamic therapy for decades, but not everyone was listening. Maybe now they will. Glatstein, vice chairman of the radiation oncology department at Penn Medicine, leads the first randomized clinical trial of photodynamic therapy (PDT) for pleural mesothelioma cancer and aims to prove its effectiveness. "If the results confirm what we expect, this could be a very positive, significant step forward for treatment of this disease," Glatstein told Asbestos.com. "If it doesn't work like we think it will, there's a lot of egg on our face."…
  • Immunotoxin SS1P Proving Effective against Mesothelioma

    Tim Povtak
    16 Jul 2014 | 3:03 pm
    Medical oncologist Raffit Hassan, M.D., has studied SS1P, the genetically engineered immunotoxin, for more than 15 years, believing it could become the key to therapeutic advancements for malignant pleural mesothelioma. He is getting closer to finding it. In Hassan’s latest clinical trial at the National Cancer Institute, SS1P was particularly effective when used in combination with the pemetrexed/cisplatin chemotherapy regimen that has become the standard, first-line treatment for cancer patients. The Phase I study, which began in 2011 and is still ongoing, was designed to determine the…
  • CDC Reinstates $2.2M Grant to Fund the Mesothelioma Tissue Bank

    Tim Povtak
    3 Jul 2014 | 2:28 pm
    The mesothelioma community – researchers, doctors, patients, families and advocates – received a much-needed boost this week when the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reversed an earlier decision and reinstated funding for the National Mesothelioma Virtual Bank (NMVB). Officials at the CDC in June restored a two-year, $2.2 million federal grant that will carry the NMVB through 2016. "Without this [funding], research of mesothelioma could have stagnated," Michael Feldman, M.D., Ph.D., professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, told…
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    Mesothelioma Cancer Alliance Blog

  • 6 Unexpected Costs of Cancer and How to Manage Them

    Staff
    28 Jul 2014 | 9:00 pm
    Cancer isn’t something that people plan for, especially financially. The most obvious cancer-related costs people have to deal with pertain directly to treatment and recovery. However, other unexpected costs can add up quickly for both patients and the friends and family around them.In the past, we’ve offered general tips on battling the costs of cancer. In this post, we’ve put together a list of some some ways that patients and their supporters can help keep down unexpected costs related to cancer.TravelPeople with long-term illnesses, especially rare illnesses like mesothelioma,…
  • Did the DC Court of Appeals Doom the Future of Obamacare?

    Barbara O'Brien
    22 Jul 2014 | 9:00 pm
    On July 22, two judges on a three-judge panel of the 3rd District Court of Appeals in Washington, DC, ruled that “Obamacare” insurance exchange subsidies are illegal in 36 states. If this decision is upheld, that means about 4.5 million people in those states will lose subsidies intended to help them afford insurance — which means they probably will lose their insurance as well. The decision threatens to throw the entire program into chaos. Insurance companies that were deeply into planning for the fall open enrollment period now have no way to know what to plan for. Further, the…
  • Can Other Minerals Besides Asbestos Induce Mesothelioma?

    Staff
    20 Jul 2014 | 9:00 pm
    While asbestos exposure is the most commonly known cause for mesothelioma, it has also been discovered that a mineral called erionite can be a cause as well. One case of erionite-induced mesothelioma has been reported in a male living in North Dakota.1 Similar cases with eronite-induced mesothelioma have also been reported in areas of Turkey. Because chronic erionite exposure must last decades before mesothelioma develops in the cases in Turkey, this single case report suggested that North Dakota (ND) may have a source for chronic erionite exposure.What is erionite?Erionite is a naturally…
  • Can Chronic Inflammation Affect Lifespan of Mesothelioma Patients?

    Staff
    13 Jul 2014 | 9:00 pm
    Chronic exposure to asbestos fibers is a major risk factor for development of mesothelioma. How asbestos induces asbestos-related disease, including mesothelioma, is being investigated and probably involves several mechanisms.Sharp asbestos fibers damage cellsDamaging asbestos fibers appear to be sharp. They appear to induce cell death in some of the cells lining the chest cavity (mesothelium comprised of mesothelial cells). These dying cells induce the neighboring cells to fill the holes and the adjacent cells proliferate or make more cells,1 like patching a hole on the elbow of a favorite…
  • Taking a Moment for Mesothelioma

    Emily Walsh
    7 Jul 2014 | 9:00 pm
    Mesothelioma is a rare and aggressive cancer that is primarily caused by asbestos exposure. To those who have never heard of the disease or have never known someone affected by it, mesothelioma may seem more like a foreign word than a real health danger. To help spread awareness about this disease, take a moment to read the key facts about mesothelioma:What is mesothelioma?It’s often thought that mesothelioma is a lung cancer, but it’s actually an aggressive cancer that affects the lining of the lungs, abdomen and heart. Mesothelioma is also quite rare with roughly 3,000 diagnoses each…
 
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    FreddaBranyon.com

  • Ten Unhealthy Breakfast Options

    Fredda Branyon
    16 Jul 2014 | 12:00 pm
    A healthy breakfast can set the tone for nutritious choices all day long. Consider these not-so-healthy breakfast foods sabotage. Low- or no-fiber cereals Source: change.org Cereal that is high in carbohydrates and sugar and low in fiber will causeq your blood sugar to spike, then quickly drop—which can lead to mid-morning cravings and moodiness. Nutritionist Mitzi Dulan, RD, author of The Pinterest Diet, recommends choosing cereal with at least 3 grams of fiber per serving. Boost the fiber further by adding berries, a sprinkle of wheat germ or flaxseed, or sliced almonds.   Breakfast…
  • Are E-Cigarettes Really Helping Smokers Quit? (Part 2)

    Fredda Branyon
    9 Jul 2014 | 12:00 am
    Image c/o Flickr A Olin The success that the e-cigarette manufacturers have attained over the past year has been tremendous. With $2 billion in sales, there seems to be no stopping the proliferation of e-cigarettes. However, the big question remains—can it replace tobacco smoking? This seems to be the question everybody is waiting to be answered. Will it be able to help smokers quit or become a device that just maintains a smoker’s habit? Since e-cigarettes have been around only for quite some time, there is only a limited amount of information available to consumers. The e-cigarette…
  • Are E-Cigarettes Really Helping Smokers Quit? (Part 1)

    Fredda Branyon
    2 Jul 2014 | 12:00 am
    image c/o Flickr Jano71 The e-cigarette business is an emerging industry, already gaining massive popularity among smokers and nonsmokers alike. Smokers are grabbing the chance to quit tobacco smoking and switch to a seemingly less harmful alternative. Non-smokers, on the other hand, are eager to try this tobacco-free smoke. Despite the growing success of the e-cigarette, its true effectiveness remains a big debate among health experts. According to some health professionals, there is a risk that promoting e-cigarettes can actually promote tobacco use, re-normalizing it. The U.S. Food and…
  • Seven Ways to Avoid Stress and Prevent Heart Disease (Part 2)

    Fredda Branyon
    25 Jun 2014 | 12:00 am
    Everyone feels stress in different amounts and reacts to it in different ways. How much stress you feel and how you react to it can lead to a wide variety of health problems — and that’s why it’s critical to know what you can do about it. When stress is constant, your body remains in high gear off and on for days or weeks at a time. Although the link between stress and heart disease isn’t clear, chronic stress may cause some people to drink too much alcohol which can increase your blood pressure and may damage the artery walls. Here’s the continuation of the previous article about…
  • Seven Ways to Avoid Stress and Prevent Heart Disease (Part 1)

    Fredda Branyon
    18 Jun 2014 | 12:00 am
    Stress is a normal part of life. But if left unmanaged, stress can lead to emotional, psychological, and even physical problems, including heart disease, high blood pressure, chest pains, or irregular heart beats. Even if you are healthy in every other aspects, especially when you’re the type who exercises often and eat vegetables regularly, stress can still affect your heart. When you’re under chronic stress, your immune system produces the stress hormones cortisol and adrenaline, and inflammatory proteins called cytokines, including interleukin-6. This chronic inflammation leads to…
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