Cancer

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  • Fiber-optic microscope will help physicians detect cancer, diseases at early stages

    Cancer News -- ScienceDaily
    15 Apr 2014 | 5:39 am
    An inexpensive, portable and re-usable endoscopic microscope has been developed that will help clinicians detect and diagnose early-stage disease, primarily cancer. An endoscopic microscope is a tool or technique that obtains histological images from inside the human body in real-time. Some clinicians consider it an optical biopsy.
  • New blood test 'accurately predicts breast cancer recurrence'

    Breast Cancer News From Medical News Today
    15 Apr 2014 | 8:00 am
    Researchers have developed a blood test that they say predicts breast cancer recurrence with up to 95% accuracy and effectively monitors patients' response to chemotherapy.
  • Experimental blood test spots recurrent breast cancers, monitors response to treatment

    Cancer News -- ScienceDaily
    15 Apr 2014 | 5:39 am
    A blood test that accurately detects the presence of advanced breast cancer and also holds promise for precisely monitoring response to cancer treatment has been designed by researchers. The test, called the cMethDNA assay, accurately detected the presence of cancer DNA in the blood of patients with metastatic breast cancers up to 95 percent of the time in laboratory studies.
  • New blood test 'accurately predicts breast cancer recurrence'

    Cancer / Oncology News From Medical News Today
    15 Apr 2014 | 8:00 am
    Researchers have developed a blood test that they say predicts breast cancer recurrence with up to 95% accuracy and effectively monitors patients' response to chemotherapy.
  • Experimental blood test spots recurrent breast cancers, monitors response to treatment

    Breast Cancer News -- ScienceDaily
    15 Apr 2014 | 5:39 am
    A blood test that accurately detects the presence of advanced breast cancer and also holds promise for precisely monitoring response to cancer treatment has been designed by researchers. The test, called the cMethDNA assay, accurately detected the presence of cancer DNA in the blood of patients with metastatic breast cancers up to 95 percent of the time in laboratory studies.
 
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    Cancer News -- ScienceDaily

  • Experimental blood test spots recurrent breast cancers, monitors response to treatment

    15 Apr 2014 | 5:39 am
    A blood test that accurately detects the presence of advanced breast cancer and also holds promise for precisely monitoring response to cancer treatment has been designed by researchers. The test, called the cMethDNA assay, accurately detected the presence of cancer DNA in the blood of patients with metastatic breast cancers up to 95 percent of the time in laboratory studies.
  • Fiber-optic microscope will help physicians detect cancer, diseases at early stages

    15 Apr 2014 | 5:39 am
    An inexpensive, portable and re-usable endoscopic microscope has been developed that will help clinicians detect and diagnose early-stage disease, primarily cancer. An endoscopic microscope is a tool or technique that obtains histological images from inside the human body in real-time. Some clinicians consider it an optical biopsy.
  • Severe sleep apnea linked to increased risk of stroke, cancer, death

    14 Apr 2014 | 12:44 pm
    Moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea is independently associated with an increased risk of stroke, cancer and death. Results of the 20-year follow-up study show that people with moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea were four times more likely to die (hazard ratio = 4.2), nearly four times more likely to have a stroke (HR = 3.7), three times more likely to die from cancer (HR = 3.4), and 2.5 times more likely to develop cancer. Results were adjusted for potential confounding factors such as body mass index, smoking status, total cholesterol and blood pressure.
  • Nano shake-up: Routine handling can affect nano drug carriers

    14 Apr 2014 | 12:44 pm
    Routine processing can affect the size of nanocarriers for targeted drug delivery, new research shows. Nanotechnology has unlocked new pathways for targeted drug delivery, including the use of nanocarriers, or capsules, that can transport cargoes of small-molecule therapeutics to specific locations in the body. The catch? These carriers are tiny, and it matters just how tiny they are. Change the size from 10 nanometers to 100 nanometers, and the drugs can end up in the wrong cells or organs and thereby damage healthy tissues.
  • 'MicroRNA' could be key target for bowel cancer treatment

    14 Apr 2014 | 9:37 am
    A tiny genetic molecule known as a microRNA plays a central role in bowel cancer and could be key to developing new treatments for the disease, a new study concludes. Drugs targeted at the microRNA could knock out the effects of multiple cancer-causing mutations at once, while tests for it could identify patients with the most aggressive disease, the researchers believe.
 
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    Breast Cancer News -- ScienceDaily

  • Experimental blood test spots recurrent breast cancers, monitors response to treatment

    15 Apr 2014 | 5:39 am
    A blood test that accurately detects the presence of advanced breast cancer and also holds promise for precisely monitoring response to cancer treatment has been designed by researchers. The test, called the cMethDNA assay, accurately detected the presence of cancer DNA in the blood of patients with metastatic breast cancers up to 95 percent of the time in laboratory studies.
  • Virus-fighting genes linked to mutations in cancer: Genetic evidence supports role of gene family in cancer development

    13 Apr 2014 | 10:59 am
    All cancer-causing processes leave a distinct mutational imprint or signature on the genomes of patients. Researchers have found a major piece of biological evidence to support the role a group of virus-fighting genes has in cancer development. The mutational signature left by the cancer-causing process driven by this family of genes is found in half of all cancer types.
  • Women with diabetes less likely to have a mammogram: Study

    11 Apr 2014 | 12:38 pm
    Women with diabetes are 14 percent less likely to be screened for breast cancer compared to women without diabetes, according to a study. "Managing the demands of a chronic condition such as diabetes is challenging for many women, leaving other preventative actions, like screening for cancer, to fall by the wayside," said a physician and author. "Our study found having diabetes posed a significant barrier to breast cancer screening even after considering a woman's socioeconomic status, a known contributor to disparities in care among women."
  • New drug, molecular insight into triple negative breast cancers

    10 Apr 2014 | 4:46 pm
    Scientists have showcased a new drug active against triple-negative breast cancer, and through analysis of the drug's mechanism of action, offer increased understanding of the biology of this very aggressive form of breast cancer.
  • Tumor-suppressor connects with histone protein to hinder gene expression

    10 Apr 2014 | 11:19 am
    A tumor-suppressing protein acts as a dimmer switch to dial down gene expression. It does this by reading a chemical message attached to another protein that's tightly intertwined with DNA, a team of scientists have learned. The findings of this study provide evidence in support of the "histone code" hypothesis. The theory holds that histone proteins, which combine with DNA to form chromosomes, are more intimately involved in gene expression than their general role of facilitating or hindering gene activation suggests.
 
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    Prostate Cancer News -- ScienceDaily

  • Recurrence of prostate cancer is significantly lower in men with blood group O

    14 Apr 2014 | 6:19 am
    A man’s blood group can affect the chance of a recurrence of prostate cancer after surgery, according to new research. This is the first time that this relationship has been demonstrated. Specifically, this new study has shown that patients with blood group O had a significantly decreased risk of cancer recurrence after radical prostatectomy.
  • Quarter of men drop out of prostate cancer monitoring, casting doubt on safety of 'active surveillance'

    12 Apr 2014 | 6:32 am
    A long-term follow up of prostate cancer patients shows that the option of monitoring slow-growing prostate cancer may not be as safe as thought, due to a quarter of men dropping out of the monitoring program. Research shows that with advancing age, most men are likely to have a cancer of the prostate, although for many the cancer will be so slow growing that it does not create a real problem.
  • New method for prostate cancer detection can save millions of men painful examination

    7 Apr 2014 | 6:05 am
    Each year prostate tissue samples are taken from over a million men around the world -- in most cases using 12 large biopsy needles -- to check whether they have prostate cancer. This medical procedure shows that 70% of the subjects do not have cancer. The examination is unnecessarily painful and involves risk for these patients, and it is also costly to carry out. A patient-friendly examination, which drastically reduces the need for biopsies, and may even eliminate them altogether, has now been developed.
  • Circumcision could prevent prostate cancer ... if it’s performed after age 35, study shows

    7 Apr 2014 | 6:02 am
    Men circumcised after the age of 35 were 45% less at risk of later developing prostate cancer than uncircumcised men. Prostate cancer is rare amongst Jewish or Muslim men, the majority of whom are circumcised. While the specific causes of this cancer remain unknown, three risk factors have been identified: aging, a family history of this cancer, and Black African ethnic origins.
  • Six months hormonal treatment in addition to radiotherapy improves survival for men with localized prostate cancer

    6 Apr 2014 | 6:44 pm
    Men with prostate cancer that is small and confined to the prostate gland but that is at risk of growing and spreading, do better if they are treated with radiotherapy combined with androgen deprivation therapy, which lowers their levels of the male hormone, testosterone, according to new research.
 
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    Lung Cancer News -- ScienceDaily

  • Lactate metabolism target halts growth in lung cancer model

    10 Apr 2014 | 9:19 am
    Targeting the enzyme responsible for the final step of glucose metabolism not only halts tumor growth in non-small-cell lung cancer, but actually leads to regression of established tumors, new research shows. Importantly the new findings also show that cancer initiating cells -tumor cells that possess stem-cell like characteristics which can give rise to new tumors -- are susceptible to LDH-A inhibition.
  • Growth factor receptors may prompt metastatic spread of lung cancer

    9 Apr 2014 | 5:45 pm
    Two cell surface receptors might be responsible for the most common form of lung cancer spreading to other parts of the body, according to a study. The hepatocyte growth factor receptor and fibroblast growth factor-inducible 14 are proteins associated with the potential spread of non-small cell lung cancer, this research shows.
  • Chemotherapy may be better for certain patients with advanced lung cancer

    8 Apr 2014 | 1:22 pm
    Among patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer without a mutation of a certain gene, conventional chemotherapy, compared with treatment using epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors, was associated with improvement in survival without progression of the cancer, but not with overall survival, according to a study.
  • Thwarting drug-resistant lung cancer with novel compound

    8 Apr 2014 | 12:41 pm
    A novel compound, COH-SR4, can target and treat drug-resistant lung cancers, research suggests. The researchers conclude: "the results from our in-vitro and in-vivo studies reveal that COH-SR4 represents a novel candidate ... to target aggressive and drug-resistant lung cancers." They are working on further preclinical research in order to apply for human trials with the Food and Drug Administration, as well studying COH-SR4's ability to fight other cancers, diabetes and obesity.
  • Phase II trial of efatutazone shows challenge of matching treatment to population

    8 Apr 2014 | 9:21 am
    A phase II trial of efatutazone with erlotinib in patients with refractory non-small cell lung cancer produced results that suggested that while efatutazone did not improve the efficacy of erlotinib, there is hope that lessons from the trial will allow researchers to make better future use of the drug or other drugs in its class.
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    About.com Colon Cancer

  • Just Diagnosed and Dealing with It

    30 Mar 2014 | 12:13 pm
    Image © Nonmim/Dreamstime Stock Photos Getting diagnosed with any kind of cancer can elicit strong reactions in the most meek of us. You might think of what you would say during that moment, but the fact is, none of us know how we will react until it becomes necessary....Read Full Post
  • Drop Your Risk of Colon Cancer

    30 Mar 2014 | 7:14 am
    Image © Nyul13505016/Dreamstime Stock Photos As the National Colon Cancer Awareness month comes to an end, our conscientiousness about the topic does not need to waver. As the second leading type of cancer, the goal should continue to focus on decreasing people's risk of developing this disease and increasing awareness of the same. If that statement sounds extraordinarily simple it's because it is simple -- although you will not get a guarantee to be cancer-free, you will decrease your risk....Read Full Post
  • Free Colorectal Cancer Resources

    25 Mar 2014 | 7:52 am
    Image © Dmitriy Shironosov/Dreamstime Stock Images That's right, I said free as in no charge, gratis, on the house, and complimentary colorectal cancer resources. There are so many mediums for colorectal cancer advocacy, support and education that it would be a shame to not highlight some of them for you....Read Full Post
  • African Americans Need Earlier Colon Cancer Screening

    20 Mar 2014 | 2:55 am
    Image © Dennis Owusu-ansah/Dreamstime Stock Photos It's largely advertised that the typical age to begin colon cancer screening is on your fiftieth birthday. Although it may not be as fun a milestone as turning 16 and driving or turning 21 and drinking, it is an important year. However, if you are an African American you are encouraged to start screening tests by your forty-fifth year....Read Full Post
  • March is National Colon Cancer Awareness Month

    28 Feb 2014 | 9:28 am
    Image © Christy Thompson/Dreamstime Stock Photos. Alright all you survivors, family members, loved ones and care providers -- tomorrow kicks off National Colon Cancer Awareness month. Dig into that closet and find your blue! The dark blue ribbon of awareness serves as a reminder to all that we are working together to stop colon cancer. I'm not a scientist and I don't have the license or skill to perform colonoscopies. My part in this war on cancer is simple: I educate, advocate, and inform. The more people I reach, the more people learn that awareness and screening are the frontline…
 
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    Colon Cancer News -- ScienceDaily

  • 'MicroRNA' could be key target for bowel cancer treatment

    14 Apr 2014 | 9:37 am
    A tiny genetic molecule known as a microRNA plays a central role in bowel cancer and could be key to developing new treatments for the disease, a new study concludes. Drugs targeted at the microRNA could knock out the effects of multiple cancer-causing mutations at once, while tests for it could identify patients with the most aggressive disease, the researchers believe.
  • Patients over 65 have more complications after colorectal cancer surgery

    9 Apr 2014 | 5:44 pm
    Most colorectal cancer surgeries are performed on patients older than 65 years, and older patients have worse outcomes than younger patients, although the total number of colon cancer operations has decreased in the past decade, a study shows. The authors examined the trends and outcomes of colorectal cancer surgery in the elderly in an American nationwide sample of inpatients from 2001 through 2010.
  • Unexpected results in cancer drug trial: Combination of cetuximab, chemo had negative results

    8 Apr 2014 | 8:15 am
    A drug, used in combination with chemotherapy to treat advanced colorectal cancer, is not effective in some settings, and indeed may result in more rapid cancer progression, research has shown. The study evaluated whether the drug cetuximab and chemotherapy together worked better than chemotherapy alone as a treatment in addition to surgery for people with bowel cancer that had spread to the liver but could be surgically removed. The researchers found that adding cetuximab to chemotherapy did not help this group of people.
  • Bacterial gut biome may guide colon cancer progression

    4 Apr 2014 | 11:04 am
    Gut bacteria can change the microenvironment in a way that promotes the growth and spread of tumors, research demonstrates. The results suggest that bacterial virulence proteins may suppress DNA repair proteins within the epithelial cells that line the colon. "There is a drastic, unmet need to look at new ways to define exactly how colon cancer forms in the gut and what triggers its progression into a lethal form," said the lead researcher. "We suggest that some bacterial proteins can promote genetic changes that create conditions in the gut that would favor the progression of colon cancer."
  • Adenoma detection rates linked to colorectal cancer, mortality

    2 Apr 2014 | 6:25 pm
    A study of over 224,000 patients and more than 314,000 colonoscopies found that adenoma detection rates closely tracked the future risk of colorectal cancer. Colonoscopies screen for colorectal cancer by detecting early, curable cancers. Precancerous adenomas -- a type of colon polyp -- can also be detected and removed, thereby preventing cancers from developing.
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    EurekAlert! - Cancer

  • Targeting cancer with a triple threat

    14 Apr 2014 | 9:00 pm
    (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) MIT chemists design nanoparticles that can deliver three cancer drugs at a time.
  • Unexpected protein partnership has implications for cancer treatment

    14 Apr 2014 | 9:00 pm
    (NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences) Scientists have identified two unlikely partners, in a type of immune cell called a macrophage, that work together, in response to cancer drugs, to increase inflammation in a way that may alter tumor growth. Researchers from the National Institutes of Health published the study in the journal Cancer Research.
  • Blood test spots recurrent breast cancers and monitors response to treatment

    14 Apr 2014 | 9:00 pm
    (Johns Hopkins Medicine) Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center investigators report they have designed a blood test that accurately detects the presence of advanced breast cancer and also holds promise for precisely monitoring response to cancer treatment.
  • Can refined categorization improve prediction of patient survival in RECIST 1.1?

    14 Apr 2014 | 9:00 pm
    (European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer) In a recent analysis by the RECIST Working Group published in the European Journal of Cancer, EORTC researchers had explored whether a more refined categorization of tumor response or various aspects of progression could improve prediction of overall survival in the RECIST database. They found that modeling target lesion tumor growth did not improve the prediction of overall survival above and beyond that of the other components of progression.
  • 'MicroRNA' could be key target for bowel cancer treatment

    13 Apr 2014 | 9:00 pm
    (Institute of Cancer Research) A tiny genetic molecule known as a microRNA plays a central role in bowel cancer and could be key to developing new treatments for the disease, a new study concludes.
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    Cancer Treatment

  • Word of the day is ENCOURAGING!

    Southern Hoffs
    15 Apr 2014 | 11:06 am
    read more
  • Some lessons to learn

    Carolines Breast Cancer Blog
    15 Apr 2014 | 4:07 am
    We can learn some lessons here. In the US we are busy being annoyed with the new healthcare system or happy to use it. But we have it and have to learn to live with it or legislate it into something else.I did not know this but Germany has a very similar health care system with the same issues - trying to reduce costs. We are busy thinking we are doing something new but we aren't. Except for a few differences, it already exists pretty much.read more
  • My goal this week is to go to work

    Carolines Breast Cancer Blog
    14 Apr 2014 | 3:57 am
    In the past two weeks I have worked 12.5 hours. I usually work 15-18 hours/week so you can say I am a tad bit 'behind'. My job isn't the kind where I have these huge looming deadlines but one where I have a consistent pile of projects that I keep digging away to keep under control. So now all my projects are behind.When I went out the door on Friday (and I NEVER work on Fridays - this gives you an idea of how far behind I am), I said to my boss, instead of telling him when I would be in next, that my goal was to go to work this week. He laughed. But it is very true.read more
  • Pain tolerance

    Carolines Breast Cancer Blog
    13 Apr 2014 | 6:31 am
    Or am I a whiner? Recently I have taken both my parents to doctor appointments. I have actually not just driven them but actually talked to their doctors with them and about them. I have now know their blood pressure and all that and heard them answer the questions are you safe at home (yes) and what is your pain level today.read more
  • That took a while

    Carolines Breast Cancer Blog
    12 Apr 2014 | 5:18 am
    I missed April Fool's Day this year because I slept through it. I had a stomach flu. Then I felt a tiny bit better. Then I started running a temperature up to 102.5. Then I stayed in bed for two days. Then I went to the doctor - that was on Monday. The verdict was I had a stomach flu that took me days to recover from.The doctor took blood work and did a urine test to make sure I didn't develop anything else while recovering. Because of my immune system with RA and being on methotrexate, my body takes a really LONG time to recover from anything.read more
 
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    Cancerwise | Cancer blog from MD Anderson Cancer Center

  • Non-Hodgkin lymphoma survivor: 'Life is precious, and I'm living it'

    Cancerwise Blogger
    15 Apr 2014 | 5:30 am
    By Jennifer Ponce Nearly eight years ago, I rang the bell at MD Anderson, signifying the end of my stage 2, large b-cell, Non-Hodgkin lymphoma treatment. This day was far more emotional than I ever could have anticipated. I had thought it would really be no big deal. In fact, I didn't even know the bell existed until a couple of days before my last radiation treatment. I took a hold of that string and rang that bell with every ounce of my being while warm tears streamed down my face and onto the floor. I knew then that I had come so far since my non-Hodgkin lymphoma diagnosis. My non-Hodgkin…
  • 8th grade science teacher and Hodgkin's lymphoma patient receives support from students

    Kellie Bramlet
    14 Apr 2014 | 5:30 am
    Shortly after Marshall and Ashley Lauen celebrated their wedding, Marshall started feeling fatigue, losing weight and was experiencing trouble breathing. He figured it was an allergy to something blowing in the Oklahoma wind. But when Ashley awoke in the middle of the night to see Marshall choking and drenched in sweat, they knew it was something more serious.Marshall's Hodgkin lymphoma diagnosis and treatment After multiple biopsies and no diagnosis, Marshall came to MD Anderson in May 2013 looking for answers. Within the first two days, Marshall received his stage 2 Hodgkin lymphoma…
  • Lung cancer survivor: 'Everything changes after cancer'

    Kellie Bramlet
    11 Apr 2014 | 5:00 am
    The scan that showed Pamela Bowman's broken pelvis -- the painful result of an afternoon of ice skating with her grandchildren -- also revealed the tumor inside her lung.Years earlier, Pamela had undergone adrenal surgery at MD Anderson. So when she received her lung cancer diagnosis, there was no doubt in her mind where she would go for lung cancer treatment."There's no place like MD Anderson," she says. "When you've got cancer, you need to go to the best."Pamela's lung cancer treatment: Finding a home away from homePamela's local doctors in Jackson, Miss., had warned her that her surgery…
  • Ovarian cancer patient: 'There's always hope'

    Cancerwise Blogger
    10 Apr 2014 | 5:30 am
    By Sarah WatsonDiana Chow calls herself a woman with options even though she has stage 4 high-grade serous ovarian cancer. She gives credit for this positive outlook to her MD Anderson care team, led by Kathleen Schmeler, M.D., associate professor in Gynecologic Oncology and Reproductive Medicine."Thank God for MD Anderson," Diana says. "Otherwise, I'm certain that right now I wouldn't be here."An unexpected ovarian cancer diagnosisDiana's cancer journey began on Dec. 16, 2010. She'd been helping her sister move furniture when she pulled an abdominal muscle. That led to a trip to the…
  • 'Super Bowl of life': Prostate cancer patient gets the gift of more time

    Cancerwise Blogger
    9 Apr 2014 | 5:22 am
    By Sarah Watson"You can't let a problem contain you. You have to contain the problem." That's Donald Lowd's motto.So the Air Force veteran was ready to fight when he received his prostate cancer diagnosis in 2009."Most people will say my life changed in 2009," Donald says. "I say that's when my fight began."Seeking prostate cancer treatment From the beginning of his prostate cancer battle, Donald knew he needed the best team to help him win the fight for his life. One oncologist told him he'd probably die in five years, but he refused to accept those odds. "That's when I said to my wife,…
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    stage iv

  • The Final Chapter

    Seth
    4 Apr 2014 | 10:05 am
    Last Friday night was probably the hardest night of my life.   At the young age of 33, my best friend, my fiancé, the love of my life, Jessica Beth Rice passed away from complications due to Bronchioloalveolar Carcinoma lung cancer. Early Tuesday morning on March 25th, Jessica was rushed to our local hospital by ambulance due to extreme head pain, nausea, and dizziness.  After several rounds of Morphine and then Dilaudid for pain relief, the doctors were able to keep her stable enough for a cat scan.   The cat scan revealed severe swelling of the tumors in her head, most alarming…
  • Rest in Peace Jessica

    Seth
    29 Mar 2014 | 8:15 pm
    Hello, my name is Wayne Gossger.  Seth and Jessica are really close friends of mine.  It is with deep regret that I need to inform you that Jessica has lost her fight with cancer and has passed away Friday evening on March 28, 2014. Seth is trying to deal with this and cannot write an update to Jessica’s blog at this time.  He promised Jessica that he would write a final post after she passed, and I’m sure he will at some point, but now is not that time.  I wanted to help him out by providing something to post so all of you are informed. All Seth and Jessica’s friends and family are…
  • Keeping My Promise

    Seth
    27 Mar 2014 | 8:15 am
    My name is Seth, and late last year, Jessica asked me if I would write a post or two to her blog once she was unable to.  This blog has been both therapeutic and rewarding to her, and it is her wish that this journey is recorded, and that everyone who has so graciously spent their time reading this blog have some closure, whenever that time comes.   That time is not yet here, so I will do my best to honor her wishes.  I promise that this will not be my final post for her, as I am sure I will have more to share about the amazing person I have come to both love and respect these past 8…
  • Strictly Speaking

    Jessica Rice
    14 Mar 2014 | 4:18 pm
    Originally drafted March 2nd, 2014. Redrafted, edited, obliterated, and corrected no fewer than 68 times since.  The side effect I’m about to share with you is something that may be temporary or permanent. We don’t know whether it is an effect of medication, disease progression, or both. Therefore it is important that we all (YOU) remain calm and not jump to conclusions on what this means for my future: short and long-term. I’ve lost and continue to lose varying degrees of muscle coordination and strength on the left side of my body. So far it has affected my left leg, arm,…
  • My Old Man

    Jessica Rice
    14 Feb 2014 | 8:07 pm
    Each February I blog when we celebrate the birthday of my first pony, Shadow. ( This post tells you more about our special bond.) This year Shadow is turning 38 years old – or so we thought… During the move, my mom found the registration document from when I first adopted him. At that time, the veterinarian’s guesstimate as to his age would have been much more accurate. And using that information, well, that means that Shadow may have celebrated his 42nd birthday today! Happy Birthday, my sweet boy. I’ll bring you something special on Sunday!
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    Mesothelioma News Center | Latest in Asbestos & Mesothelioma News

  • Fox Chase Committing Its Best to Mesothelioma Treatment

    Tim Povtak
    3 Apr 2014 | 12:16 pm
    The Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia doesn't handle as many pleural mesothelioma cases as some of the other specialty centers, but the care it provides them and outcomes it produces are second to none. Mesothelioma cancer is a high priority. "I don't think you can get better care anywhere else," said Walter Scott, M.D., chief of thoracic surgical oncology at Fox Chase. "We've got the experts with experience. And we've got that great support team around them." Scott spoke at the conclusion of the sixth annual Advances in Thoracic Oncology Conference last week. The program, which…
  • Japan Study Finds Standard Chemotherapy Still Best Hope for Mesothelioma

    Tim Povtak
    28 Mar 2014 | 3:16 pm
    The long-standing chemotherapy combination of cisplatin and pemetrexed will remain the front-line treatment regimen for mesothelioma patients in the foreseeable future, despite recent efforts to develop newer and more effective drugs. Nothing better has emerged. Researchers at the Shizuoka Cancer Center and Juntendo University in Japan recently concluded that the cisplatin/pemetrexed (Alimta) combination remains the best choice. "It should continue to be the standard, front-line chemotherapeutic regimen for inoperable MPM (malignant pleural mesothelioma)," wrote the authors of the March…
  • Study: Palliative Chemotherapy Not Meeting Patient Expectations

    Tim Povtak
    20 Mar 2014 | 10:01 am
    Mesothelioma patients and their caregivers should take a closer look and decide on their priorities before starting palliative care chemotherapy, which has disappointed many in the past, according to a recent study. Although it is designed to prolong survival and ease symptoms for terminal cancer patients, palliative care chemotherapy often ends with a diminished quality of life, more invasive, late-stage medical procedures, and dying in a less than desirable setting. Researchers also have found a startling gap between the type of end-of-life cancer care patients wanted, and what they…
  • EPP Surgery Still Plays Important Role in Mesothelioma Treatment

    Tim Povtak
    13 Mar 2014 | 11:21 am
    The much-debated and extremely aggressive extrapleural pneumonectomy (EPP) surgery still should play a prominent role in the management of mesothelioma, according to a recent U.K. study. The study reopened the simmering controversy over the value of the EPP by contradicting the conclusions of previous research that prompted some specialists to stop doing the surgery and others to dramatically reduce the number of procedures. The EPP involves the removal of an entire lung, the lining surrounding the lung and heart, along with major parts of the diaphragm — all in a curative attempt to remove…
  • Pleural Mesothelioma Survivor Plans to Dance in the Rain

    Tim Povtak
    11 Mar 2014 | 11:52 am
    Rosalie C. carries an iPad with a message that she sees each time it awakens, helping inspire her through the good times and the bad: "Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass. It's about learning to dance in the rain." She isn't sure what her future holds — it's in God's hands — but she can tell you confidently now her immediate plans: Dance in the rain every day. Rosalie and her husband, Larry, will leave Florida soon, returning to their farm outside Ft. Wayne, Ind., to start planting spring crops, fully expecting to return again to the Sunshine State after the late-fall harvest.
 
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    Mesothelioma Cancer Alliance Blog

  • Developing a Cancer Survivorship Plan

    David Haas
    14 Apr 2014 | 9:00 pm
    It is estimated that two out of three people diagnosed with cancer will live five years or longer after their initial diagnosis. Healthcare professionals advise that the quality of care after a patient has entered remission will have a profound impact on the life expectancy of a survivor. Therefore, it’s very important to develop a survivorship plan to help you and your loved ones enjoy life every given day and adjust to your new normal.Healthcare HonestySurvivors often worry about what they should and shouldn't tell their doctors when it comes to new symptoms and health concerns. If a…
  • Stress Awareness and Cancer - Tips for Coping as a Caregiver

    Staff
    7 Apr 2014 | 9:00 pm
    When a patient receives a cancer diagnosis, a spouse, parent, or close friend often takes on a caregiver role. Since they are not paid, they are called informal caregivers or family caregivers. Most caregivers are women (60%), middle-aged, and have a full time job (59%).In addition to their previous roles, caregivers often coordinate cancer care, manage finances, help with dressing, eating, bathing, and giving medication, make medical decisions, and shuttle the cancer patient to doctor appointments, tests, and treatments. In some cases, the caregiver also shops for food, prepares meals and…
  • Stress Awareness and Cancer - Tips for Coping with a Diagnosis and Treatments

    Staff
    6 Apr 2014 | 9:00 pm
    A cancer diagnosis sends chills down most people’s spine and triggers much stress. The stress can appear as fear, brain overload, slowness, fatigue, difficulty sleeping, worry about one’s life and loved ones, less interest in life, and occasionally nausea, and vomiting. Some people feel the stress as a hassled feeling of not enough time to get everything done, reliving regrets, and wanting to spend more time with family and friends.Five Ways to Cope with the Stress of a Cancer Diagnosis Let cancer become your teacher: Doing battle with cancer adds more strain to an already stressed…
  • Advocate of the Month - April 2014

    MCA Warrior Stories
    31 Mar 2014 | 9:00 pm
    The Mesothelioma Cancer Alliance would like to thank Sara Gapasin for sharing her story about how asbestos exposure affected her family's life as the April Advocate of the Month. Asbestos-related cancer took the life of her grandfather, breast cancer claimed her grandmother, and Sara also lives with her own disease, Rheumatoid Arthritis. Being no stranger to health adversity, Sara still shares a message of hope. Read on to learn Sara's story and share it to help raise awareness of the dangers of asbestos.It is a great honor to be featured as the Mesothelioma Cancer Alliance's Advocate of the…
  • A Closer Look: Understanding Clinical Trials

    Jennifer Lucarelli
    30 Mar 2014 | 9:00 pm
    If you have been diagnosed with mesothelioma, you may consider participating in a clinical trial.Generally, clinical trials test experimental drugs and treatments and aim to develop new ways of detecting and diagnosing a disease. Doctors use clinical trials to determine whether a new treatment works and is safe—in fact, all new drugs and devices must go through a clinical trial before they are approved by the FDA.Clinical trials testing new drugs for the treatment of cancer often compare the effectiveness of the new drug with the current standard of treatment. In this type of clinical…
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  • What You Should Know About Piercings, Oral Jewelry, and Tongue Splitting (Part 1)

    Fredda Branyon
    9 Apr 2014 | 12:00 am
    There seems to be an ongoing trend with tongue modification and oral jewelry, but there is little to no knowledge of the kinds of effects these may have on a person’s oral health. Motivation for tongue splitting remains varied, from increased sensation to challenging oneself. The same can be said for mouth jewelry, specifically piercings, as people have piercing for a variety of reasons, mainly for its aesthetic appeal and enhanced sensation. Many of these people find the tongue modification and jewelry to enhance their appearance, but most are probably unaware of the effects these things…
  • Common Sores and Other Mouth Irritations You Should Know About

    Fredda Branyon
    2 Apr 2014 | 12:00 am
    Your oral health is not limited to your teeth. Sores or irritations can also develop in and around your mouth. Fortunately, they usually heal on their own within a week or two. Although several types of soft-tissue disturbances can affect the mouth, we will be discussing four common ones: canker sores, cold sores, leukoplakia and oral candidiasis. Canker Sores – Canker sores develop inside the mouth as small white or gray sores that have a red border. They are not contagious. They may occur as one sore or several. In some cases, the cause is unknown, but trauma to oral soft tissues is a…
  • Kick Those Butts Before They Kill You: Revisiting the Dangers of Tobacco Use

    Fredda Branyon
    26 Mar 2014 | 12:24 am
    Kick Butts Day is on March 19, a national day for activism led by The Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids. Its aim to lower the numbers of people getting sick and dying due to cigarette smoking by promoting the spread of information regarding the dangers of tobacco use in both children and adults.   The sad but bitter truth about cigarette smoking is that addiction starts at a very young age, with so many individuals becoming strongly addicted to the destructive habit before they even reach the age of 18. This is why the focus of the tobacco-free campaign is geared towards the young, because…
  • March is Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month

    Fredda Branyon
    24 Mar 2014 | 1:50 am
    Cancer is one of the most debilitating diseases in the world. It is a global pandemic and affects millions of lives and taken just as many. This March, we focus on raising awareness for colorectal cancer. What most people might not know is that it is one of the most beatable forms of cancer, most especially when it is detected early. It is preventable and treatable, something that is not present in other forms of cancer. Despite this opportunity for treatment, colorectal cancer, otherwise called as either cancer of the colon or rectum, remains the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the…
  • Kick “Butts” Day on March 19: Campaign for a Tobacco-Free Youth

    Fredda Branyon
    19 Mar 2014 | 12:23 am
    The dangers of cigarette smoking has always been known to the greater population, but it has not stopped children to experiment at an early stage. Kids between the ages of 11 and 13 are now are among those that have been reported to first try smoking, which is alarming because experimentation usually develops into a regular habit. March 19 marks Kick Butts Day,  a national day of activism in the United States that raises awareness about tobacco use and to empower them to stand against it. Parents, teachers, youth leaders, and health advocates are encouraged to organize events and other…
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