Cancer

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  • What to say to someone with cancer

    Cancerwise | Cancer blog from MD Anderson Cancer Center
    Cancerwise Blogger
    15 Sep 2014 | 5:30 am
    By Amanda Woodward When I was undergoing melanoma treatment, I encountered a lot of people who struggled to find the right words to say to me.I get it: it's awkward. But the things you say can have a big impact on cancer patients. Some things may do more harm than good. This includes things like "My cousin's friend's nephew's aunt had that same kind of cancer. She died." Ditto for "Have your tried eating kale? I heard that gets rid of cancer." To help make the world a kinder place for cancer patients, I got together with some friends and made a list of what to say to someone with cancer.
  • 19 ways to help someone with cancer

    Cancerwise | Cancer blog from MD Anderson Cancer Center
    Cancerwise Blogger
    17 Sep 2014 | 5:30 am
    Want to help a friend or loved one dealing with cancer? It can be hard to know exactly what you can or should do.  That's why we asked the cancer patients, survivors and caregivers in our Facebook community to tell us the most helpful thing you can do for a friend or loved one dealing with cancer. Here's their advice. 1. Visit. Cancer patients and caregivers are still people, and they want to see you, talk to you and laugh with you. 2. Listen. Ask questions to show you care, but let your friend or loved one lead the conversation.3. Pray. 4. Find a way to help and just do it. Don't ask if…
  • Better way to track emerging cell therapies using MRIs

    Cancer News -- ScienceDaily
    19 Sep 2014 | 11:28 am
    The first human tests of using a perfluorocarbon (PFC) tracer in combination with non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging to track therapeutic immune cells injected into patients with colorectal cancer have been reported by scientists.
  • Better research and education for advanced breast cancer needed

    Breast Cancer News From Medical News Today
    22 Sep 2014 | 12:00 am
    Breast cancer experts around the world have issued a plea to researchers, academics, drug companies, funders and advocates to carry out high quality research and clinical trials for advanced breast...
  • New cancer drug target involving lipid chemical messengers

    Cancer News -- ScienceDaily
    19 Sep 2014 | 1:54 pm
    More than half of human cancers have abnormally upregulated chemical signals related to lipid metabolism, yet how these signals are controlled during tumor formation is not fully understood. Researchers report that TIPE3, a newly described oncogenic protein, promotes cancer by targeting these pathways.
 
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    Cancer News -- ScienceDaily

  • New cancer drug target involving lipid chemical messengers

    19 Sep 2014 | 1:54 pm
    More than half of human cancers have abnormally upregulated chemical signals related to lipid metabolism, yet how these signals are controlled during tumor formation is not fully understood. Researchers report that TIPE3, a newly described oncogenic protein, promotes cancer by targeting these pathways.
  • Better way to track emerging cell therapies using MRIs

    19 Sep 2014 | 11:28 am
    The first human tests of using a perfluorocarbon (PFC) tracer in combination with non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging to track therapeutic immune cells injected into patients with colorectal cancer have been reported by scientists.
  • Pathway that contributes to Alzheimer's disease revealed by research

    19 Sep 2014 | 11:07 am
    A defect in a key cell-signaling pathway has been discovered that researchers say contributes to both overproduction of toxic protein in the brains of Alzheimer’s disease patients as well as loss of communication between neurons — both significant contributors to this type of dementia.
  • Some patients with advanced, incurable cancer denied palliative care

    19 Sep 2014 | 8:06 am
    Many patients with advanced, incurable cancer do not receive any palliative care, reveals new research. The findings are astonishing as they come at the same time as 15 new oncology centres in Europe, Canada, South America and Africa are being awarded the title of 'ESMO Designated Centre of Integrated Oncology and Palliative Care.'
  • Wireless sensor transmits tumor pressure

    19 Sep 2014 | 6:27 am
    A novel sensor that can wirelessly relay pressure readings from inside a tumor has been developed by researchers. The interstitial pressure inside a tumor is often remarkably high compared to normal tissues and is thought to impede the delivery of chemotherapeutic agents as well as decrease the effectiveness of radiation therapy. While medications exist that temporarily decrease tumor pressure, identifying the optimal window to initiate treatment -- when tumor pressure is lowest -- has remained a challenge.
 
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    Breast Cancer News -- ScienceDaily

  • Double mastectomy: 'Angelina Effect' in referrals for genetic counseling and breast cancer testing

    18 Sep 2014 | 6:01 pm
    Referrals for genetic counseling and testing for breast cancer risk more than doubled across the UK after actress Angelina Jolie announced in May last year that she tested positive for a BRCA1 gene mutation and underwent a double mastectomy. The rise in referrals continued through to October long after the announcement was made, a study shows.
  • Newer tests clarify hereditary risk of cancer

    18 Sep 2014 | 9:13 am
    Not all genetics tests that screen for cancer risk are the same, says a genetics counselor. While knowing you are at a higher genetic risk for cancer is stressful, that knowledge can guide how you manage your health going forward. For instance, you might be more likely to stay on top of health screenings or choose to have preventative surgery, which can be a difficult choice, she outlines.
  • Benefit of endocrine therapy in elderly women with low risk hormone receptor positive breast cancer?

    16 Sep 2014 | 1:25 pm
    Treatment with endocrine therapy and radiation therapy as part of breast conservation is the current standard of care for women with hormone-receptor positive invasive breast cancer. A new study, however, shows that combination may not be necessary for all patient populations with the disease.
  • Focus on treatment costs, value: Less radiation for elderly women with early breast cancer

    16 Sep 2014 | 1:25 pm
    In a healthcare climate where the costs of treatment are increasingly weighed against potential benefit, a study has found that radiation oncologists are using fewer or less-aggressive radiation procedures on elderly women with early-stage breast cancer.
  • Lactation linked to reduced estrogen receptor-negative, triple-negative breast cancer risk

    16 Sep 2014 | 8:29 am
    Women who have had children (parous women) appear to have an increased risk of developing estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer, the subtype that carries a higher mortality rate and is more common in women of African ancestry. A similar relationship was found for triple-negative breast cancer. However, the association between childbearing and increased risk of estrogen receptor-negative and triple-negative breast cancer was largely confined to the women who had never breastfed.
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    Artsy Asylum

  • Went To The Gym For The First Time Today

    admin
    1 Sep 2014 | 11:30 am
    I must confess I’m not exactly the slimmest girl on the block. I’m not chubby either, don’t get me wrong. However… we do have a slight tendency towards becoming slightly obese over a long period of time in our family. I see it as a genetic trait. My mom has it, my dad has it. Even my sister has it. And I have it too. I eat healthy foods most of the time, but still I gain weight when I’m not exercising at the same time. I suppose those few chunks of chocolate that I have per week are really adding up to the total calorie count. Today, I hit the gym together with a…
  • Welcome To My New Website, The Artsiest Asylum On The Net!

    admin
    26 Aug 2014 | 4:12 am
    Hello world, my name is Amber! This is my very first blog. I’ve never really written anything on the web before. Well, except maybe on Facebook. But I would hardly count that as publishing anything worhtwhile. A friend of mine has helped me set up this website, because I couldn’t do it when I was going at it alone. I was looking for a good domain name and came up with this one. Turns out it was just expiring. It used to belong to a woman named Susan Reynolds, who had now forwarded it to her new blog. I’ve taken the liberty of reading some of her writing. Susan Reynolds has…
 
 
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    Prostate Cancer News -- ScienceDaily

  • Vitamin E, selenium supplements unlikely to affect age-related cataracts in men

    18 Sep 2014 | 1:23 pm
    Taking daily supplements of selenium or vitamin E appears to have no significant effect on the development of age-related cataracts in men. Some research, including animal studies, has suggested that dietary nutrients can have an effect on the onset and progression of cataracts. Vitamin E and selenium are of particular interest.
  • Professional recommendations against routine prostate cancer screening have little effect

    18 Sep 2014 | 7:14 am
    The effect of guidelines recommending that elderly men should not be routinely screened for prostate cancer “has been minimal at best,” according to a new study. The review focused on the use of PSA – prostate-specific antigen – to test for prostate cancer.
  • Blood test could identify when cancer treatment has become detrimental

    17 Sep 2014 | 11:14 am
    Some treatments for prostate cancer, while initially effective at controlling the disease, not only stop working over time but actually start driving tumor growth, a major new study shows. Researchers, in a new study, set out a new 'treatment paradigm' -- the constant monitoring of patients using a blood test for signs that therapy is becoming counter-productive.
  • Finding new genetic links to prostate cancer

    17 Sep 2014 | 9:12 am
    23 new regions of the genome have been discovered that influence the risk for developing prostate cancer, according to a study. Prostate cancer is the most common non-skin cancer in American men. About 1 in 6 men will be diagnosed with the disease in his lifetime. Family history is the strongest risk factor. A man with one close relative, a brother or father with prostate cancer is twice as likely to develop the disease as a man with no family history of prostate cancer.
  • Study identifies when and how much various prostate cancer treatments will impact urinary and sexual functioning

    16 Sep 2014 | 1:25 pm
    Men with prostate cancer may one day be able to predict when and how much various treatments will impact their urinary and sexual functioning, thanks in part to new findings.
 
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    my Breast Cancer blog

  • A Night to Remember

    Jacki
    19 Sep 2014 | 8:10 pm
    It has been almost TEN YEARS since I stood with a malignant tumor in my left breast and watched my sleeping 3-year-old in his big-boy bed and my sleeping 18-month-old in his comfy crib and tried like mad to crush the panic in my gut that told me I may not see these beautiful beings grow up. And […]
  • On Paper

    Jacki
    12 Sep 2014 | 11:52 am
    This is me. On paper. In black and white. Defined by numbers. Like 1.1 (size of my breast cancer tumor in centimeters), 1 (stage of my disease), 4 (number of lymph nodes removed), 12 (number of Herception infusions I received), 93 (percentage that predicted my survival for 5 years). The numbers go on and on. […]
  • Why I Posted a Skin Selfie

    Jacki
    2 Sep 2014 | 9:00 am
    My intention today was NOT to post a no-make-up selfie (or any selfie at all, really) on Facebook, but I did because these photos tell a story of a girl who did not listen her to wise grandma when she warned of the dangers of tanning, a girl who cried her mascara off this morning […]
  • And the Survey Says . . .

    Jacki
    30 Aug 2014 | 1:25 pm
    Yesterday, I featured a poll asking, “Which one is the wig?” The results are in. And the answer is: The wig is shown in the bottom image. Thank you for playing!
  • Hair It Is

    Jacki
    29 Aug 2014 | 9:34 am
    I knew the day my nurse walked into my exam room post-lumpectomy and pathology with wig catalogue in hand that I would receive chemo for breast cancer. I was devastated. DEVASTATED. But I managed to survive baldness for the few months it lasted because I found a wig that kind of tricked people into thinking […]
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    Colon Cancer News -- ScienceDaily

  • Newer tests clarify hereditary risk of cancer

    18 Sep 2014 | 9:13 am
    Not all genetics tests that screen for cancer risk are the same, says a genetics counselor. While knowing you are at a higher genetic risk for cancer is stressful, that knowledge can guide how you manage your health going forward. For instance, you might be more likely to stay on top of health screenings or choose to have preventative surgery, which can be a difficult choice, she outlines.
  • Five genes to predict colorectal cancer relapses

    17 Sep 2014 | 9:07 am
    Five genes have been discovered differentially expressed in normal accompanying cells in colorectal tumors. Analysis of these genes could be used to classify colorectal tumors, predict the evolution of the patient and thus take appropriate clinical decisions to prevent relapses.
  • Genetic modifier impacts colon tumor formation

    9 Sep 2014 | 9:26 am
    Unexpected results from an ongoing experiment led to a potentially important discovery that could have an impact on how cancer researchers test anti-cancer therapies in mice, and possibly prevent colon cancer in people.
  • Gobbling up poison: Method for killing colon cancer

    8 Sep 2014 | 10:51 am
    A new immunotoxin works by getting shuttled into cancer cells and selectively destroying colon cancer, thanks to a quirk of biology. Colon cancer cells will gobble up poison if it's attached to a key receptor on the cell's surface, researchers have found. Indeed, the researchers demonstrated that the novel immunotoxin they created could reduce the lung metastasis in mice, which had grown out from colon cancers, by more than 80 percent with only 6 doses.
  • Drug shows promise for subset of stage III colon cancer patients

    28 Aug 2014 | 8:08 am
    A subset of patients with stage III colon cancer had improved survival rates when treated with irinotecan-based therapy, according to a new study. When added to the standard chemotherapy treatment -- fluorouracil and leucovorin -- adjuvant irinotecan therapy improved overall survival rates for patients with the CpG island methylator phenotype.
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    EurekAlert! - Cancer

  • The Jackson Laboratory and BIDMC announce multifaceted affiliation

    21 Sep 2014 | 9:00 pm
    (Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center) The Jackson Laboratory and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center have established a new academic, research and service relationship to advance cancer research and patient care and accelerate personalized genomic medicine.
  • E-cigarettes unhelpful in smoking cessation among cancer patients

    21 Sep 2014 | 9:00 pm
    (Wiley) In a new study of cancer patients who smoke, those using e-cigarettes, in addition to traditional cigarettes, were more nicotine dependent and equally or less likely to have quit smoking traditional cigarettes than non-users.
  • New rules for anticancer vaccines

    21 Sep 2014 | 9:00 pm
    (Rockefeller University Press) Scientists have found a way to find the proverbial needle in the cancer antigen haystack. The results have the potential to completely change current approaches to generating anticancer vaccines.
  • Singapore researchers discover a gene that increases incidence of AML

    21 Sep 2014 | 9:00 pm
    (National University of Singapore) A novel study by the Cancer Science Institute of Singapore at the National University of Singapore found that an increase in a gene known as Leo1 affects other genes that are directly implicated in acute myelogenous leukaemia, increasing the incidence of cancer.
  • Cancer cells adapt energy needs to spread illness to other organs

    20 Sep 2014 | 9:00 pm
    (University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) Scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have found that cancer cells traveling to other sites have different energy needs from their 'stay-at-home' siblings which continue to proliferate at the original tumor site.
 
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    Cancer Treatment

  • Let's go back to the 'why me' conversation for a minute

    Carolines Breast Cancer Blog
    22 Sep 2014 | 4:42 am
    At some point along the denial slope of coping with your diagnosis, you sit there and ponder 'why me'? Why did I get this ailment?We learn through this article that it can have something to do with where you  live. Look at this lovely map showing rates of breast cancer diagnosis per 100,000 women:read more
  • Call me a moron

    Carolines Breast Cancer Blog
    21 Sep 2014 | 7:38 am
    Let's start at the beginning. I forgot to blog yesterday. Completely forgot. It slipped my mind completely. But I do have an excuse, we had a small college reunion here yesterday afternoon and I was busy getting ready. I also am a moron because I lost one of my favorite earrings yesterday at the party. I am still scouring the house  as we speak and hope it will turn up but not very optimistic because it is a small stud earring, but relatively valuable and sentimental as well because my husband gave me the pair.read more
  • The Pessimistic Side of Curing Cancer

    Carolines Breast Cancer Blog
    19 Sep 2014 | 4:52 am
    Two blog posts caught my eye this week on the problems with finding a cure for cancer. There is lots of hoohaa going on with we can cure cancer. There is even the deadline(?) of 2020 to find a cure for breast cancer. But here is a look at the other side of finding a cure for cancer.The first article is on "Coming Together to Fight Cancer" that lists the five issues involved:read more
  • Court Document Paints Detroit Oncologist Farid Fata As Doctor Nightmare

    Ross Bonander
    18 Sep 2014 | 5:13 am
    Dr. Farid Fata, owner of Michigan Hematology Oncology, cancer centers in the Detroit area, has pleaded guilty to 16 counts of criminal conduct including fraud, and therefore he has avoided a trial. But when you read the legal complaint filed in court, you can't help but think this guy is guilty of so much more than what he plead to. And that he might be one of the worst doctors ever. read more
  • Celebrating more birthdays

    Carolines Breast Cancer Blog
    18 Sep 2014 | 4:32 am
    The American Cancer Society has/had a campaign on celebrating more birthdays. Really its just another way of saying 'another year on the right side of the daisies'. I'm all for it.There have been times in my life where I would think 'if I make it to X, I'll do Y'. I was going to have a party 20 years out from my first cancer diagnosis, then 25 years out. It still hasn't happened.read more
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    cancerhawk

  • The Power of Resilience is in EVERYONE!

    Robyn
    13 Sep 2014 | 6:01 am
    The power of resilience is in everyone.   I saw this on HopeLab’s FaceBook Page and had to repost it on CancerHawk today.  It so eloquently redefines what is within each of us. Cancer has shown me that each one of us is stronger than we realize.  When you look in the mirror, what do you see? xoxoxoxoxo
  • 2014 – 2015 Top Ranked US Cancer Hospitals

    Robyn
    9 Sep 2014 | 11:33 am
    Each year US News & World Report ranks the top 50 cancer hospitals in the US.  Every hospital ranked is experienced in treating difficult cases.  Reputation among specialists, survival rates, success in keeping patients safe and patient volume are among the criteria used to evaluate the cancer hospitals.  For a complete explanation of how these rankings are determined, click HERE. *** Regardless of which hospital center you choose, even if it’s a top ranked one, it is still important to get a second opinion… or a 3rd or a 4th. *** So without further ado, below are the…
  • The 411 on Cancer Immunotherapy

    Robyn
    3 Sep 2014 | 6:58 pm
      One of the most promising areas in cancer research and precision medicine today is “Immunotherapy“.  Credited as the first therapy ever proven to extend the lives of patients with metastatic melanoma, immunotherapy is changing the way some cancers are treated.   Here’s the dealio (as my daughter always says)…  Immunotherapy refers to aclass of treatments that use the body’s own immune system to help fight cancer.  Some treatments boost the body’s immune system in a very general way, while others help train the immune system to attack cancer…
  • What You Need to Know About Breast Reconstruction

    Robyn
    1 Sep 2014 | 6:32 am
    The Cancer Support Community surveyed 762 breast cancer survivors (who were eligible for breast reconstruction) and found that 43% of these women did not receive any info about breast reconstruction PRIOR to making surgical decisions (mastectomy or lumpectomy). Why is this a huge problem? Well, if you opt to reconstruct one or both boobs, the method you choose to reconstruct can be affected depending on how the initial surgery is done. Since you can’t go back and re-do your mastectomy, this is an extremely important conversation to have with your doctor BEFORE a mastectomy takes place.
  • Fight Cancer & WIN! With This Kick-Ass Cancer Fighting Video Game

    Robyn
    24 Aug 2014 | 6:58 pm
      Any oncologist or parent will tell you that getting young cancer patients (that includes children, teenagers and even young adults) to stick to their treatment regimens and take their medications when and how they have been prescribed is no easy task.  To help encourage treatment adherence (which improves outcomes and saves lives!), researchers at HopeLab created  Re-Mission2,a series of six very cool, FREE video games that are super fun to play, a tad bit addicting  AND help it’s players beat a diagnosis of cancer.   Here’s how it works:  …
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    Cancerwise | Cancer blog from MD Anderson Cancer Center

  • 5 tips for dealing with chemotherapy

    Cancerwise Blogger
    22 Sep 2014 | 5:30 am
    By Carissa LucasAs a 25-year-old athlete with an almost perfect health history, my lymphoma diagnosis was a crushing blow. It happened so quickly that I almost didn't have time to process what was happening to me, until I found myself sitting in an infusion room a week later receiving my first round of chemotherapy. I won't deny it: chemotherapy is tough. However I found some strategies that helped me cope. Though everyone responds to treatment differently, I hope at least one of these strategies makes chemo a little easier for you. Get some candy or mints I actually didn't have a problem…
  • What my family learned from life after melanoma treatment

    Cancerwise Blogger
    19 Sep 2014 | 5:30 am
    By Jennifer Martin When my husband, Steve, was diagnosed with stage IV melanoma, he was given six to nine months to live. That was almost three years ago. After Steve underwent several rounds of biochemotherapy, a major surgery, Zelboraf and Yervoy, doctors performed scans and found no evidence of disease (NED). Now our family is getting ready for another round of scans to see if Steve is still NED. Regardless of the outcome, we've learned a few things in the past year. The fear never goes away. Every time Steve has a scan or doctor's appointment, it feels like we are starting all over again…
  • 19 ways to help someone with cancer

    Cancerwise Blogger
    17 Sep 2014 | 5:30 am
    Want to help a friend or loved one dealing with cancer? It can be hard to know exactly what you can or should do.  That's why we asked the cancer patients, survivors and caregivers in our Facebook community to tell us the most helpful thing you can do for a friend or loved one dealing with cancer. Here's their advice. 1. Visit. Cancer patients and caregivers are still people, and they want to see you, talk to you and laugh with you. 2. Listen. Ask questions to show you care, but let your friend or loved one lead the conversation.3. Pray. 4. Find a way to help and just do it. Don't ask if…
  • A stem cell transplant patient's tips for recovery

    Cancerwise Blogger
    16 Sep 2014 | 5:30 am
    By Harley HudsonOne day at a timeIt's not easy to askOne day at a timeIt's quite a taskI want to run aheadTo know what liesJust around the cornerA week, a month, a year from nowIs what I want to knowOne day at a timeIt's all I need to knowOne day at a timeI'll take it real slowEarly in my chronic lymphocyctic leukemia (CLL) journey, my wife Melanie and I had learned to take things one day at a time. It has not been an easy lesson, and I'm not sure I have mastered it yet. But I'm working on it. This lesson has been especially important following my stem cell transplant. If I had expected to…
  • What to say to someone with cancer

    Cancerwise Blogger
    15 Sep 2014 | 5:30 am
    By Amanda Woodward When I was undergoing melanoma treatment, I encountered a lot of people who struggled to find the right words to say to me.I get it: it's awkward. But the things you say can have a big impact on cancer patients. Some things may do more harm than good. This includes things like "My cousin's friend's nephew's aunt had that same kind of cancer. She died." Ditto for "Have your tried eating kale? I heard that gets rid of cancer." To help make the world a kinder place for cancer patients, I got together with some friends and made a list of what to say to someone with cancer.
 
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    Mesothelioma News Center | Latest in Asbestos & Mesothelioma News

  • Joe Sample, Jazz Pioneer, Dies of Mesothelioma

    Kaitlyn Fusco
    20 Sep 2014 | 6:54 pm
    Joe Sample, a musician who became a household name by pushing the limits of jazz music, died of mesothelioma on Sept. 12 in his hometown of Houston. He was 75. The legendary keyboard player and composer is known as the founder of the Jazz Crusaders, a bebop ensemble that originated in his high school days. The group later dropped “Jazz” from its name and became known as The Crusaders — a band with a distinctive, amalgamated jazz, funk, blues and soul sound. Although his family confirmed he died of mesothelioma, news reports do not explain how he developed the asbestos-related cancer…
  • Aggressive Therapy Shows Hope for Peritoneal Mesothelioma Patients

    Tim Povtak
    16 Sep 2014 | 1:30 pm
    Repeating an aggressive procedure that removes recurring cancer tumors from a patient's abdominal cavity and bathes the area in a heated chemotherapy solution is extending the lives of some peritoneal mesothelioma patients. A recent retrospective analysis of 161 peritoneal mesothelioma patients at the Washington Cancer Institute shows those who repeated cytoreductive surgery (CRS) and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) two or three times after the initial procedure are living five, 10 or more years beyond their prognosis. The median overall survival rate at the cancer institute…
  • Researchers Evaluating Proposed Peritoneal Mesothelioma Staging System

    Michelle Whitmer
    12 Sep 2014 | 1:13 pm
    Data gathered by an international group of peritoneal mesothelioma experts is leading to changes in the way patients with this rare asbestos-related disease are diagnosed and treated. The cancer's rarity and resistance to treatment have complicated past efforts to create a formal staging system. Its low incidence also has limited the amount of data necessary to ensure a staging system is useful. Dr. W. Charles Conway, of the Ochsner Cancer Institute in New Orleans, offers insight into a batch of data collected over a 20-year span that is paving the path toward formalizing a staging system for…
  • Surgeons Make Cancer Cells Glow Bright Green to Reduce Recurrence

    Tim Povtak
    9 Sep 2014 | 12:48 pm
    Making cancer tumors glow in the dark may sound like 1950s science fiction, but specialists say the luminous invaders could help reduce recurrence. Thoracic surgeons, who are mostly limited to sight and feel in identifying tumors and their margins, often inadvertently leave behind cancer cells that increase the chance and rate of a cancer returning. However, doctors in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania are injecting lung cancer patients with a dye that makes cancerous tissue glow bright green under near-infrared light (NIF), making tumors more identifiable…
  • Using Light Energy to Kill Mesothelioma Cancer Cells

    Tim Povtak
    8 Sep 2014 | 8:12 am
    A clinical trial at the Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center will start using light energy to kill cancer cells in patients with malignant mesothelioma. Doctors at that cancer center have successfully used the treatment on patients with esophageal and lung cancer, but this is the first time they will use the therapy on patients with the deadly asbestos-related disease. The treatment, known as photodynamic therapy (PDT), is not meant as a cure for mesothelioma. Instead, doctors want to see if it can help control or delay recurrence of the illness, killing any microscopic cancer…
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    Mesothelioma Cancer Alliance Blog

  • How Do Cancer Cells Develop?

    Staff
    15 Sep 2014 | 9:00 pm
    Each day, doctors and research and health organizations are working to better understand the development process of cancer. By understanding how a disease develops, doctors and researchers can create more targeted treatment protocols for patients.Normal cells behave themselves—when cells are damaged, they grow into the adjacent spaces and then stop. However, the first inklings of transformation into cancer starts with damage to a cell. Cells can sense when their DNA has been damaged using the p53 gene. The p53 gene can determine the damage in the cell and start a cascade of enzymes and…
  • Advocate of the Month - September 2014

    MCA Warrior Stories
    1 Sep 2014 | 9:00 pm
    The Mesothelioma Cancer Alliance would like to thank Hana Haatainen-Caye for contributing as our September Advocate of the Month. Hana is a writer, speaker, and voice-over talent who spreads her passion for green living on her blog Green Grandma. Today, she shares her story of how asbestos and mesothelioma have played a part in her life. Read and share her story below:I grew up less than two blocks away from an asbestos plant in Manheim, PA. I don’t know what the actual name of the company was in my early years, we just referred to it as “The Asbestos.” My mom worked in the office…
  • Combating Chemotherapy's Side Effects With Nutrition

    Jennifer Lucarelli
    25 Aug 2014 | 9:00 pm
    Many mesothelioma patients choose to undergo chemotherapy as part of their cancer treatment. Unfortunately, chemotherapy may cause loss of appetite, nausea, sore mouths, and fatigue; often, chemotherapy leads to weight loss. While many patients find it difficult to eat before and after chemotherapy treatments, nutritious food can be a powerful tool that mesothelioma patients may use to combat cancer and the side-effects of chemotherapy. Rebecca Katz, author of The Cancer-Fighting Kitchen and One Bite at a Time cookbooks, provides cancer patients and their families with nutritious, wholesome…
  • Can a Popular Mesothelioma Chemotherapy Treatment Cause Kidney Damage?

    Staff
    24 Aug 2014 | 9:00 pm
    For mesothelioma patients, a number of factors come into play when trying to determine what treatment options will be most effective. For patients who choose to undergo chemotherapy treatments, the commonly used combination of pemetrexed and cisplatin is shown to have potentially harmful effects on a patient's kidneys.When mesothelioma patients are treated with the anti-folate anti-cancer agent, pemetrexed, and cisplatin, most patients are instructed to supplement with folic acid and vitamin B12 which can reduce some of pemetrexed’s side effects.1,2 About 1 in 3 patients (35%) treated with…
  • Photodynamic Light Therapy as a Potential Mesothelioma Treatment

    Staff
    10 Aug 2014 | 9:00 pm
    For mesothelioma patients, there is a potential new treatment option involving photodynamic therapy.What is photodynamic therapy?Photodynamic therapy uses a laser that produces light at a specific wavelength and a chemical called a photosensitizing agent in a three step process:(1) patients are given a photosensitizing chemical that makes cells very sensitive to light, such as photofrin®, Levulan®, Metvixia®;(2) their cells take it up within hours (4-72 hours, usually) and become sensitive to light; and(3) a physician shines a special laser on the tumor nodule, the chosen wavelength of…
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    FreddaBranyon.com

  • ALS Facts You Need to Know Before Taking the Ice Bucket Challenge

    Fredda Branyon
    17 Sep 2014 | 12:00 am
    If you are social media-savvy, then there is no way you could have missed the trending phenomenon that is taking the internet by storm. Dubbed the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge, this movement seeks to raise awareness on a rare but extremely lethal neurodegenerative disease called amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Creative Commons The challenge starts when someone nominates you to either donate money to the ALS Association or do the Ice Bucket Challenge. This is done in the hopes of either raising awareness and/or encourage people to donate to the cause. If you decide to accept the challenge,…
  • Ten Unhealthy Breakfast Options

    Fredda Branyon
    10 Sep 2014 | 12:00 am
    A healthy breakfast can set the tone for nutritious choices all day long. Consider these not-so-healthy breakfast foods sabotage. Low- or no-fiber cereals Source: change.org Cereal that is high in carbohydrates and sugar and low in fiber will causeq your blood sugar to spike, then quickly drop—which can lead to mid-morning cravings and moodiness. Nutritionist Mitzi Dulan, RD, author of The Pinterest Diet, recommends choosing cereal with at least 3 grams of fiber per serving. Boost the fiber further by adding berries, a sprinkle of wheat germ or flaxseed, or sliced almonds.   Breakfast…
  • Shorter day, less sunlight

    Fredda Branyon
    3 Sep 2014 | 12:50 am
    Source: Infographic Did you know that autumn means shorter days and longer nights? This means less time for individuals to bask under the sun, and appreciate the warmth that comes with it. Since we rely on the sun’s rays to give us some of the nutrition we need, individuals need to come up with ways to cope with it. Take a look at this infographic and see just how much limited sun exposure can affect a person. Maybe the next time you go outside for a walk on a sunny day, you can enjoy the sun a bit more than you have in the past. Dr. Fredda Branyon has dedicated her life to the advancement…
  • Common Summer Illnesses You Need to Avoid (Part 2)

    Fredda Branyon
    27 Aug 2014 | 12:52 am
    Common Summer Illnesses You Need to Avoid (Part 2) Source:penn-bariatric It’s amazing how you can never run out of things to do during summer. From long walks in the park to playing frisbee on the beach with your friends and family, summer is definitely time to enjoy the outdoors. However, there are health issues that you need to be aware of before you go frolicking under the sun. You may have read the first part of this blog post, so here’s the continuation.   Source:omaha Fireworks Injuries – July is the United States’ Independence Day, and an average of 200 are rushed to…
  • Common Summer Illnesses You Need to Avoid (Part 1)

    Fredda Branyon
    20 Aug 2014 | 12:46 am
    Common Summer Illnesses You Need to Avoid (Part 1) Source:crystalgraphics Barbecues in the yard and long walks on the beach are summer activities that everyone partakes in and loves. However, people do not just have good memories of summer, they have bad ones too, especially when they develop common summer illnesses in the midst of the fun they are having. So here’s a straightforward guide on the common summer illnesses and information on how you can prevent them.   Recreational Water Illnesses (RWI) – These types of illnesses have doubled over the last two decades, so the risks…
 
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    Cancer, Medicine and Life

  • The Fault in Our Stars: Cancer based Movie

    14 Sep 2014 | 12:04 am
    Saw the movie "The Fault in Our Stars" today. Nicely done. Good acting. More importantly taught me about the the "person suffering" as compared to the "patient with an illness".What about life beyond doctors visits, chemotherapy sessions, support groups, etc? What about friendship circles? What happens to relationships? What about families? Parents, brothers, sisters, Husbands, Wives, Children? The trauma of the entire process of treatment and poor prognosis (several times).Good movie.
  • Best Cancer Chemotherapy Reference Website in the World

    9 May 2014 | 10:36 am
    I think that the best true cancer chemotherapy reference website in the world is www.eviq.org.auIt is a free registration for access, and gives you detailed information about chemotherapy regimes, protocols, patient information sheets, supportive care data, etc.Brilliant site.
  • Women and the Cancer Gene - ABC

    6 May 2014 | 2:56 pm
    Nice article from the ABC by Elise Worthington. This highlights the issues with BRCA1 genes.  http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-05-07/worthington-deadly-decisions-women-and-the-cancer-gene/5432570
  • Look Good Feel Better - for cancer patients

    23 Apr 2014 | 5:47 pm
    Look Good Feel Better - www.lgfb.org.auFor patients with cancer who feel dreadful about their appearance, this workshop is great. I personally think that it is not so much for the make-up and cosmetics that help them.... as much as the fellowship of knowing that there are so many other people in the same boat as them.Massive boost to their esteem and confidence.This is an initiative of the Australian cosmetic industry for cancer patients in Australia.A definite suggestion to patients.from www.lgfb.org.au
  • Alternative Medicine in Curable Cancer

    23 Apr 2014 | 4:55 pm
    One of the most frustrating things in the clinic is meeting with patients and their families who refuse standard proven treatment in favour of options which may not have any logical or scientific basis.It gets worse when the cancer is completely curable with standard treatment.Most of us can reason with patients to an extent, after which it is their call. Their life. Their responsibility.Or is it?Do we as a medical community need to increase awareness about wrong information being dissipated amongst patients and their families? Or do we already have enough work than to spend time on this.
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