Cancer

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  • Genetic cause of common breast tumors found

    Breast Cancer News -- ScienceDaily
    20 Jul 2014 | 5:43 pm
    A major breakthrough in understanding the molecular basis of fibroadenoma, one of the most common breast tumors diagnosed in women, has been made by a multidisciplinary team of scientists. The team used advanced DNA sequencing technologies to identify a critical gene called MED12 that was repeatedly disrupted in nearly 60 percent of fibroadenoma cases.
  • Understanding how neuro cells turn cancerous

    Cancer News -- ScienceDaily
    22 Jul 2014 | 10:06 am
    New research, for the first time, brings scientists nearer to understanding how some cells in the brain and nervous system become cancerous. The team studied a tumor suppressor called Merlin. Their results have identified a new mechanism whereby Merlin suppresses tumors, and that the mechanism operates within the nucleus. The research team has discovered that unsuppressed tumor cells increase via a core signalling system, the hippo pathway, and they have identified the route and method by which this signalling occurs.
  • How social work counselors help our cancer patients

    Cancerwise | Cancer blog from MD Anderson Cancer Center
    Cancerwise Blogger
    21 Jul 2014 | 5:34 am
    By Traci Newsom, Social Work CounselorA cancer diagnosis affects people differently. However, every cancer patient has one thing in common: At some point during their journey, they undoubtedly experience stress. As a social work counselor here at MD Anderson, it's part of my job to help alleviate some of that stress. I do this by enabling patients to better focus on themselves and their actual care. What our social workers doPeople expect to see medical providers at their appointments. But they often forget to ask about or are not aware of the additional support available to them. This…
  • Genes that contribute to radiation resistance identified

    Cancer News -- ScienceDaily
    21 Jul 2014 | 9:38 am
    Forty-six genes in Escherichia coli have been discovered that are necessary for its survival at exceptionally high levels of radiation, researchers report in a new article. "The research has revealed new pathways of cellular self-repair, including DNA pathways that in humans that may help protect us from cancer," says a corresponding author.
  • Drug discovered that targets tumour cell metabolism of aggressive type of lung cancer

    Lung Cancer News From Medical News Today
    15 Jul 2014 | 12:00 am
    Manchester scientists have shown that a new drug could prove useful in treating small cell lung cancer - the most aggressive form of lung cancer.
 
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    Cancer News -- ScienceDaily

  • Vitamin D deficiency raises risk of schizophrenia diagnosis

    22 Jul 2014 | 11:25 am
    Vitamin D-deficient individuals are twice as likely to be diagnosed with schizophrenia as people who have sufficient levels of the vitamin, according to a new study. Vitamin D helps the body absorb calcium and is needed for bone and muscle health. The skin naturally produces this vitamin after exposure to sunlight. People also obtain smaller amounts of the vitamin through foods, such as milk fortified with vitamin D. More than 1 billion people worldwide are estimated to have deficient levels of vitamin D due to limited sunshine exposure.
  • Understanding how neuro cells turn cancerous

    22 Jul 2014 | 10:06 am
    New research, for the first time, brings scientists nearer to understanding how some cells in the brain and nervous system become cancerous. The team studied a tumor suppressor called Merlin. Their results have identified a new mechanism whereby Merlin suppresses tumors, and that the mechanism operates within the nucleus. The research team has discovered that unsuppressed tumor cells increase via a core signalling system, the hippo pathway, and they have identified the route and method by which this signalling occurs.
  • Anti-cancer drug kicks HIV out of hiding

    22 Jul 2014 | 7:22 am
    An anti-cancer drug can activate hidden HIV, a pilot study by HIV researchers has shown. The researchers found that the anti-cancer drug romidepsin increased the virus production in HIV-infected cells between 2.1 and 3.9 times above normal and that the viral load in the blood increased to measurable levels in five out of six patients with HIV infection.
  • Viral therapy could boost limb-saving cancer treatment

    22 Jul 2014 | 6:15 am
    Viruses designed to target and kill cancer cells could boost the effectiveness of chemotherapy to the arms and legs and help avoid amputation, a new study reports. Researchers tested the effectiveness of a genetically engineered version of the virus used to vaccinate against smallpox. They found use of the virus alongside isolated limb perfusion chemotherapy -- given directly to blood vessels supplying the affected arm or leg as an alternative to amputation -- was more effective in rats than either treatment on its own.
  • Genes that contribute to radiation resistance identified

    21 Jul 2014 | 9:38 am
    Forty-six genes in Escherichia coli have been discovered that are necessary for its survival at exceptionally high levels of radiation, researchers report in a new article. "The research has revealed new pathways of cellular self-repair, including DNA pathways that in humans that may help protect us from cancer," says a corresponding author.
 
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    Breast Cancer News -- ScienceDaily

  • Genetic cause of common breast tumors found

    20 Jul 2014 | 5:43 pm
    A major breakthrough in understanding the molecular basis of fibroadenoma, one of the most common breast tumors diagnosed in women, has been made by a multidisciplinary team of scientists. The team used advanced DNA sequencing technologies to identify a critical gene called MED12 that was repeatedly disrupted in nearly 60 percent of fibroadenoma cases.
  • Targets for immunotherapy in early-stage breast cancer

    18 Jul 2014 | 10:15 am
    A new molecular analysis tool has been used to detect the level of an important target for immunotherapy in early-stage breast cancers, researchers report. The diagnostic test, using RNAScope, measures the amount of PD-L1 mRNA in cancer tissues and is devoid of many of the technical issues that plague antibody-based detection methods that have yielded conflicting results in the past. PD-L1 is the target of several novel immune stimulatory therapies in clinical trials.
  • Cancer study maps decade of discovery to potential anticancer agent

    17 Jul 2014 | 9:45 am
    In the lab, a scientific team has used an approach combining functional RNAi analysis with gene expression analysis in breast cancer-derived cell lines and in human breast cancers replicated in mice. Using these multidimensional datasets for human breast cancer, PLK4 has been identified as a candidate target among 10,000 other targets for the development of anticancer therapeutics. "This finding led to the identification of CFI-400945, a selective and orally active inhibitor of PLK4, which was shown to have significant antitumor activity as a single agent in a variety of preclinical tumor…
  • Saving the heart in breast cancer treatment

    17 Jul 2014 | 6:48 am
    Breast cancer awareness campaigns stress saving the breasts - but what about the heart? Breast cancer patients who are positive for the HER2 gene may be at increased risk for heart damage during chemotherapy, according to a new study. Cardio-oncology is a relatively new field of research, emerging as scientists and doctors understand the connections between cancer treatment and the heart.
  • Screening costs increased in older women without changing detection rates of early stage breast cancer

    16 Jul 2014 | 1:58 pm
    Medicare spending on breast cancer screening increased substantially between 2001 and 2009 but the detection rates of early stage tumors were unchanged, according to a new study. The effect of introduction of new breast cancer screening modalities, such as digital images, CAD, and use of ultrasound and MRI on screening costs among older women is unknown, although women over the age of 65 represent almost one-third of the total women screened in the US annually.
 
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    Prostate Cancer News -- ScienceDaily

  • Robot-assisted surgery for prostate cancer controls the disease for 10 years

    16 Jul 2014 | 12:11 pm
    Robot-assisted surgery to remove cancerous prostate glands is effective in controlling the disease for 10 years, according to a new study. The study also suggested that traditional methods of measuring the severity and possible spread of the cancer together with molecular techniques might, with further research, help to create personalized, cost-effective treatment regimens for prostate cancer patients who undergo the surgical procedure.
  • Prostate cancer in young men: More frequent, more aggressive?

    15 Jul 2014 | 1:59 pm
    The number of younger men diagnosed with prostate cancer has increased nearly 6-fold in the last 20 years, and the disease is more likely to be aggressive in these younger men, according to a new analysis. Typically, prostate cancer occurs more frequently as men age into their 70s or 80s. However, the researchers found that when prostate cancer strikes at a younger age, it's likely because the tumor is growing quickly.
  • Diagnosing physicians influence treatment decisions for prostate cancer patients, study finds

    14 Jul 2014 | 3:19 pm
    New research is shedding light on the important role a diagnosing urologist plays in whether older men with low-risk prostate cancer receive treatment for their disease, and if so, the type of treatment they receive as a result. The study sought to examine why active surveillance, a management program for low-risk disease, which includes repeat PSAs, prostate exams and biopsies, is underused in this patient population.
  • 15-year overall survival benefit lacking in older men treated with hormone therapy for early-stage prostate cancer

    14 Jul 2014 | 3:19 pm
    A popular prostate cancer treatment that disables male hormones known to promote growth of prostate cancer lacks survival benefit for older men with localized disease, a study concludes. The study focuses on ADT, which for the past 15 years has become a popular alternative to surgery, radiation or conservative management when used as the only therapy.
  • New metastasis-suppressor gene identified by cancer researchers

    11 Jul 2014 | 10:26 am
    A new suppressor of cancer metastasis, FOXO4, has been identified by cancer researchers. Among patients with deadly cancers, more than 90 percent die because of metastatic spread of their disease. The new findings may point the way toward development of more effective treatments for prostate cancers and other malignant solid tumors.
 
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    Lung Cancer News -- ScienceDaily

  • New gene discovered that stops spread of deadly cancer: Scientists identify gene that fights metastasis of a common lung cancer

    17 Jul 2014 | 9:45 am
    A gene responsible for stopping the movement of cancer from the lungs to other parts of the body has been discovered by researchers, indicating a new way to fight one of the world’s deadliest cancers. By identifying the cause of this metastasis, which often happens quickly in lung cancer and results in a bleak survival rate, scientists are able to explain why some tumors are more prone to spreading than others. The newly discovered pathway may also help researchers understand and treat the spread of melanoma and cervical cancers.
  • New drug active against most aggressive type of lung cancer cells

    10 Jul 2014 | 5:13 am
    A new drug could prove useful in treating small cell lung cancer -- the most aggressive form of lung cancer, researchers report. Scientists tested a drug -- known as AZD3965 -- on small cell lung cancer cells, with a focus on exploiting the change in energy production in tumors. In cancer cells, there is a switch to using glycolysis, a process that requires less oxygen and produces lactate as a by-product. Certain molecules -- monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) -- are involved in the movement of lactate out of cells and drugs that target MCTs have been shown to stop tumor growth.
  • Lung cancer study hints at new treatments

    9 Jul 2014 | 10:54 am
    Studying the most common type of lung cancer, researchers have uncovered mutations in a cell-signaling pathway that plays a role in forming tumors. The new knowledge may expand treatments for patients because drugs targeting some of these genetic changes already are available or are in clinical trials.
  • Investigating new therapies to suppress mutant cancer tumor proteins

    9 Jul 2014 | 6:52 am
    New research underway is focusing on the mutant version of the p53 tumor protein and how it is vulnerable to certain compounds. When p53 is functioning normally, it regulates the cycle of a cell. It is known as a tumor suppressor because it does not allow cells to divide uncontrollably, the hallmark of a cancer cell. But once p53 turns mutant and goes from quiet Dr. Bruce Banner to the destructive Incredible Hulk, it's no longer preventing cancer; it's potentially causing it.
  • Chemotherapy resistance in inflammatory breast cancer due to newly identified mechanism

    7 Jul 2014 | 1:15 pm
    A mechanism of breast cancer cells that leads to chemotherapy resistance in inflammatory breast cancer has been identified by researchers. Inflammatory breast cancer is the most aggressive type of advanced breast cancer and is characterized by rapid development, resistance to chemotherapy, early metastases and a poor prognosis. Inflammatory breast cancer cells display a triple-negative breast cancer phenotype that lacks the receptors needed to promote tumor growth. Therefore, common treatments are not effective for this breast cancer subtype.
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    Colon Cancer News -- ScienceDaily

  • Gut microbes turn carbs into colorectal cancer, study shows

    17 Jul 2014 | 9:48 am
    Colorectal cancer has been linked to carbohydrate-rich western diets, but the underlying mechanisms have been unclear. A new study shows that gut microbes metabolize carbohydrates in the diet, causing intestinal cells to proliferate and form tumors in mice that are genetically predisposed to colorectal cancer. Treatment with antibiotics or a low-carbohydrate diet significantly reduced tumors in these mice, suggesting that these easy interventions could prevent a common type of colorectal cancer in humans.
  • Possible pathway for inhibiting liver, colon cancer found

    8 Jul 2014 | 8:12 am
    The structure of a protein complex involved in liver and colon cancers has been revealed by an international team of researchers. This structural data discovery opens up additional research opportunities into drugs that can act on the binding of these proteins, thereby possibly inhibiting cancer cell growth.
  • People with HIV with early-stage cancers are up to four times more likely to go untreated for cancer

    30 Jun 2014 | 1:39 pm
    People with HIV who are diagnosed with cancer are two to four times more likely to go untreated for their cancer compared to uninfected cancer patients, according to a new, large retrospective study. Life expectancy for HIV-infected people is now similar to uninfected people, but survival for HIV patients who develop cancer is not. While many studies have attempted to understand why HIV-infected cancer patients have worse outcomes, the new study examined differences in cancer treatment as one potential explanation.
  • Cetuximab or bevacizumab with combi chemo equivalent in KRAS wild-type MCRC

    28 Jun 2014 | 5:24 am
    For patients with KRAS wild-type untreated colorectal cancer, adding cetuximab or bevacizumab to combination chemotherapy offers equivalent survival, researchers said.
  • Genetics the dominant risk factor in common cancers

    27 Jun 2014 | 6:44 am
    A study of individuals who have been adopted has identified genetics as the dominant risk factor in ‘familial’ breast, prostate and colorectal cancers. Researchers have presented the new research findings based on studies of population registers.“The results of our study do not mean that an individual’s lifestyle is not important for the individual’s risk of developing cancer, but it suggests that the risk for the three most common types of cancer is dependent to a greater extent on genetics”, said the lead of the study.
 
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    EurekAlert! - Cancer

  • New research finds pathogenic connection between autoimmune disorders and cancer

    21 Jul 2014 | 9:00 pm
    (George Washington University) Autoimmune disorders may share certain pathogenic mechanisms with cancer, according to a new report published in PLOS ONE by Linda Kusner, Ph.D., assistant research professor in the Department of Pharmacology and Physiology at the George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences.
  • The 6th Latin American Conference on Lung Cancer (LALCA 2014)

    21 Jul 2014 | 9:00 pm
    (International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer) The 6th Latin American Conference on Lung Cancer will be held August 21 - 23, 2014 in Lima, Peru.
  • Research brings us nearer to understanding how neuro cells turn cancerous

    21 Jul 2014 | 9:00 pm
    (University of Plymouth) Scientists from the Sloan-Kettering Institute for Cancer Research in New York with the help of Plymouth University Peninsula Schools of Medicine and Dentistry have completed research which for the first time brings us nearer to understanding how some cells in the brain and nervous system become cancerous.
  • Viral therapy could boost limb-saving cancer treatment

    21 Jul 2014 | 9:00 pm
    (Institute of Cancer Research) Viruses designed to target and kill cancer cells could boost the effectiveness of chemotherapy to the arms and legs and help avoid amputation, a new study reports.
  • Study examines presence of uterine cancers at the time of hysterectomy using morcellation

    21 Jul 2014 | 9:00 pm
    (The JAMA Network Journals) Among women undergoing a minimally invasive hysterectomy using electric power morcellation, uterine cancers were present in 27 per 10,000 women at the time of the procedure, according to a study published by JAMA. There has been concern that this procedure, in which the uterus is fragmented into smaller pieces, may result in the spread of undetected malignancies.
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    Cancer Treatment

  • Medical errors - and what if they didn't tell us?

    Carolines Breast Cancer Blog
    22 Jul 2014 | 4:02 am
    Massachusetts General Hospital archivesDr. Ernest Amory Codman.read more
  • Specialty Drug Prices are Killing the Patients

    Carolines Breast Cancer Blog
    21 Jul 2014 | 3:28 am
    I know I have blogged about this before but it just irks me of the inequalities that I see in this system. I do not have a grudge against big pharma. I really do not. I just wish there was more change in the system where drug companies seem to be tightening the noose on patients who are trying to survive.read more
  • Sleeping, or not

    Carolines Breast Cancer Blog
    20 Jul 2014 | 5:40 am
    I have problems sleeping these days. On a good night, I get to sleep for a solid 12 hours. I'm not kidding. I hope to do this once a week at least. Not this weekend. If I can, I save my big sleeping nights for the weekend because I don't have to get up in the morning.read more
  • Why do I bother to ask these questions anyway?

    Carolines Breast Cancer Blog
    19 Jul 2014 | 4:40 am
    This week I saw my oncologist for my annual check up. I am happy to only see her once a year... Except when I nominated her for an award last winter or when I ran into her in the hallway at the hospital. So, I, who am never afraid of the direct question, asked her "so what are my chances of more cancer?". Why not ask? I would prefer to know what can be known. This little question of what could be coming in the future has been irking me for years.The answers I got were:read more
  • I miss his smile. I miss everything about him.

    Southern Hoffs
    18 Jul 2014 | 12:49 pm
    Picture taken 7/5/14<read more
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    cancerhawk

  • FREE Running Program for Cancer Survivors in MD, DC, VA, NY & Chicago

    Robyn
    15 Jul 2014 | 6:46 pm
    Andy & Alan @ Rockville Rotary Twilighter 8K Runfest 1992   Pictured above is my husband Alan (on the right) with his childhood friend Andy.  Since this picture was taken, Andy has run more than 30 marathons, completed 13 triathlons and has become a certified running coach.  Despite all these accomplishments, Andy always made time to go for a run or walk with Alan, even after he was diagnosed with cancer.   It was no surprise to me that Andy connected with The Ulman Cancer Fund’s CANCER to 5K Training Program - a FREE 12-week training program designed to introduce…
  • Financial Assistance from Walk In My Shoes Cancer Foundation

    Robyn
    11 Jul 2014 | 11:23 am
      Image credit: richcat / 123RF Stock Photo   If you’ve been diagnosed with cancer and are having a hard time making ends meet, check out the Walk In My Shoes Foundation. Walk In My Shoes Foundation assists cancer patients with paying rent, mortgages, utility bills, medication, purchasing gas cards, buying groceries, etc.  To qualify for assistance, which is based on availability, the following guidelines have been set: Only patients undergoing cancer treatment are eligible for assistance. Only bills in patient’s name are eligible for payment. Maximum assistance…
  • All Hail Kale & This Yummy Salad Recipe

    Robyn
    8 Jul 2014 | 9:26 am
    Natural Health Magazine   Eating healthy, good-for-you foods during and post-treatment can help cancer patients feel better and stay stronger.  Proper nutrition can help them keep up their body weight and strength, keep body tissue healthy, and fight infection.   Dark leafy greens are the rockstars of the produce department as they have the most concentrated source of nutrition we have.  Kale is a nutritional powerhouse.  Calorie for calorie, kale has more iron than beef and more calcium than milk.  Kale is also loaded with vitamin K.  According to a study in the American…
  • The 4 Stages of Mesothelioma & Their Treatment Options

    Robyn
    7 Jul 2014 | 9:00 am
    Meet GUEST BLOGGER Michelle Whitmer.  Michelle has been a medical writer and editor for The Mesothelioma Center since 2008. Focused on the benefits of natural and holistic medicine for cancer patients, Michelle is a certified yoga instructor and earned her B.A. in Environmental Studies from Rollins College in Florida. Accurately diagnosing a mesothelioma patient’s stage of cancer development is essential to getting appropriate treatment. The stages of mesothelioma are determined by the degree of tumor growth and spread. Stage I represents minimal tumor growth and stage IV indicates…
  • Personalizing YOUR Cancer Treatment (part 4): Do you know your cancer biomarkers?

    Robyn
    24 Jun 2014 | 5:45 am
    In the near future, instead of saying, “I have breast cancer,” a patient will say something like , “I have a HER2-positive carcinoma with a KRAS mutation.”  Cancer will be defined by it’s own unique molecular profile and biomarkers rather than the body part where it originated. To learn more about the dozens of biomarkers already being used to guide cancer treatment, check out the table below. Please note: there are thousands of known biomarkers without currently known effectiveness or relevance to cancer care. This table only represents the biomarkers that are currently…
 
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    mAss Kickers Foundation Group Blog

  • We are moving the blog to mAssKickers.org

    27 Jun 2014 | 6:34 pm
    WE ARE MOVING! TO www.masskickers.org
  • 2014 "How to Kick mAss" World Tour

    16 May 2014 | 5:38 pm
    We are planning on taking a few tumor/cancer survivors to different areas of the pacific ocean to dispel the myth that “cancer is a death sentence.”  Internationally, cancer survivorship is not as prominent as it is in the United States.  Our plan is to educate the future healthcare professionals, current healthcare professionals, and patients that life after an intimidating tumor/cancer is not only possible but can also lead to changes in the stigma that cancer is a death sentence.We firmly believe that the global stigma of a tumor/cancer diagnosis as a death sentence…
  • TUMORS SUCK 2014 Part 3

    15 May 2014 | 3:53 pm
  • OMG 2014, Las Vegas

    1 May 2014 | 6:57 pm
    *originally published on www.ericgalvezdpt.com This past weekend I went to my third OMG Cancer Summit for young adult survivors.  I always come back from this conference physically exhausted, but emotionally recharged.  We decided not to table this year in order to enjoy the conference and network on a more personal level with the attendees!  I love going to this event because it is a great feeling finding people who have gone through similar experiences and understand the nuances of why you have to do things... As an 8-year young brain tumor survivor turned brain tumor…
  • TUMORS SUCK 2014 Part 2

    1 May 2014 | 6:46 pm
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    Cancerwise | Cancer blog from MD Anderson Cancer Center

  • Honoring a brother's legacy by supporting brain cancer research

    Cancerwise Blogger
    22 Jul 2014 | 6:39 am
    In 2000, Chris Anthony visited MD Anderson for a consultation with Mark Gilbert, M.D., deputy chair of Neuro-Oncology. Chris had been diagnosed with a glioblastoma multiforme, the most common and most aggressive brain tumor, and had undergone surgery to remove his tumor just two weeks earlier.Chris had traveled to MD Anderson with wife, Kirsten, and brother, Matt. All three understood the seriousness of his diagnosis and low survival rate of less than two years. They felt Chris could receive the best treatment possible at MD Anderson. Chris immediately felt comfortable with Dr. Gilbert -- his…
  • How social work counselors help our cancer patients

    Cancerwise Blogger
    21 Jul 2014 | 5:34 am
    By Traci Newsom, Social Work CounselorA cancer diagnosis affects people differently. However, every cancer patient has one thing in common: At some point during their journey, they undoubtedly experience stress. As a social work counselor here at MD Anderson, it's part of my job to help alleviate some of that stress. I do this by enabling patients to better focus on themselves and their actual care. What our social workers doPeople expect to see medical providers at their appointments. But they often forget to ask about or are not aware of the additional support available to them. This…
  • How a week at camp made a difference for a young medulloblastoma patient

    Cancerwise Blogger
    18 Jul 2014 | 5:30 am
    By Gaylene Meeson We didn't hesitate to sign our daughter Hannah up for MD Anderson Children's Cancer Hospital's Camp Star Trails.When we learned about the camp back in April, Hannah and I had just returned from a weekend at a camp outside Houston, so Hannah knew all about camp and she really wanted to go.  A few months later, I began packing Hannah's things for camp. That's when it dawned on me that my 6-year-old daughter, who'd been diagnosed with anaplastic medulloblastoma in 2012, would be in someone else's care for six days.Not only that, but Hannah had become scared and no longer…
  • Brothers' oligodendroglioma journey brings family closer together

    Kellie Bramlet
    17 Jul 2014 | 5:45 am
    When Zach Greene was diagnosed with an oligodendroglioma brain tumor in 2010, his younger brother Spencer knew what to expect. Just two years earlier Spencer had just begun his own oligodendroglioma treatment. There's no genetic explanation behind the brothers' brain tumor diagnosis -- just bad luck, the brothers say, knowing quite well that it's an understatement.And while they wish it would have happened any other way, the family's shared oligodendroglioma diagnosis has made them closer. "That's been the silver lining in this mess of a situation," Zach says. His dad, Brock, agrees. "We're…
  • 4 tips for exercising during cancer treatment

    Deborah Thomas
    16 Jul 2014 | 5:34 am
    Research shows that exercise is safe and beneficial for most cancer patients and survivors. In fact, in most cases, it is important to keep exercising during cancer treatment. "Exercise has the potential to help reduce some of the fatigue experienced during and after treatment, especially if you're undergoing radiation therapy. And, it can help prevent weight gain commonly experienced during chemotherapy treatment," says Carol Harrison, senior exercise physiologist. Exercise also has the potential to improve your psychological outlook and improve your quality of life. But you may need to make…
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    Mesothelioma News Center | Latest in Asbestos & Mesothelioma News

  • Mesothelioma Clinical Trial Should Prove Worth of Photodynamic Therapy

    Tim Povtak
    18 Jul 2014 | 8:44 am
    Eli Glatstein, M.D., has touted the benefits of photodynamic therapy for decades, but not everyone was listening. Maybe now they will. Glatstein, vice chairman of the radiation oncology department at Penn Medicine, leads the first randomized clinical trial of photodynamic therapy (PDT) for pleural mesothelioma cancer and aims to prove its effectiveness. "If the results confirm what we expect, this could be a very positive, significant step forward for treatment of this disease," Glatstein told Asbestos.com. "If it doesn't work like we think it will, there's a lot of egg on our face."…
  • Immunotoxin SS1P Proving Effective against Mesothelioma

    Tim Povtak
    16 Jul 2014 | 3:03 pm
    Medical oncologist Raffit Hassan, M.D., has studied SS1P, the genetically engineered immunotoxin, for more than 15 years, believing it could become the key to therapeutic advancements for malignant pleural mesothelioma. He is getting closer to finding it. In Hassan’s latest clinical trial at the National Cancer Institute, SS1P was particularly effective when used in combination with the pemetrexed/cisplatin chemotherapy regimen that has become the standard, first-line treatment for cancer patients. The Phase I study, which began in 2011 and is still ongoing, was designed to determine the…
  • CDC Reinstates $2.2M Grant to Fund the Mesothelioma Tissue Bank

    Tim Povtak
    3 Jul 2014 | 2:28 pm
    The mesothelioma community – researchers, doctors, patients, families and advocates – received a much-needed boost this week when the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reversed an earlier decision and reinstated funding for the National Mesothelioma Virtual Bank (NMVB). Officials at the CDC in June restored a two-year, $2.2 million federal grant that will carry the NMVB through 2016. "Without this [funding], research of mesothelioma could have stagnated," Michael Feldman, M.D., Ph.D., professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, told…
  • Could Red Wine Enhance Effectiveness of Chemotherapy for Mesothelioma?

    Tim Povtak
    30 Jun 2014 | 11:13 am
    Researchers in South Korea have uncovered an unusual synergy between a chemical found in red wine and a drug used to treat childhood leukemia that has translated into a potential future treatment options for malignant mesothelioma. The combination of resveratrol, which comes from the skin of red grapes, and the drug clofarabine, has shown an ability to make mesothelioma cells much more vulnerable to chemotherapy. Researchers found the resveratrol/clofarabine combination prevented tumor cell proliferation and triggered programmed cell death. It also left healthy cells untouched. "I think that…
  • Immunotherapy Clinical Trial Showing Promise in Stopping Mesothelioma Recurrence

    Tim Povtak
    25 Jun 2014 | 2:22 pm
    Even after the best multimodal treatment approach – a combination of two or more therapies (chemotherapy, surgery and radiation) – the probability of mesothelioma cancer recurrence remains high because of the diffuse nature of the disease. Researchers are moving closer to fixing that dilemma. Doctors currently are testing a Wilms’ tumor 1 (WT1) peptide vaccine for its ability to halt mesothelioma recurrence in a Phase II clinical trial conducted at the MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston. MD Anderson still is accepting new participants for this randomized study that began in 2013. The…
 
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    Mesothelioma Cancer Alliance Blog

  • Can Other Minerals Besides Asbestos Induce Mesothelioma?

    Staff
    20 Jul 2014 | 9:00 pm
    While asbestos exposure is the most commonly known cause for mesothelioma, it has also been discovered that a mineral called erionite can be a cause as well. One case of erionite-induced mesothelioma has been reported in a male living in North Dakota.1 Similar cases with eronite-induced mesothelioma have also been reported in areas of Turkey. Because chronic erionite exposure must last decades before mesothelioma develops in the cases in Turkey, this single case report suggested that North Dakota (ND) may have a source for chronic erionite exposure.What is erionite?Erionite is a naturally…
  • Can Chronic Inflammation Affect Lifespan of Mesothelioma Patients?

    Staff
    13 Jul 2014 | 9:00 pm
    Chronic exposure to asbestos fibers is a major risk factor for development of mesothelioma. How asbestos induces asbestos-related disease, including mesothelioma, is being investigated and probably involves several mechanisms.Sharp asbestos fibers damage cellsDamaging asbestos fibers appear to be sharp. They appear to induce cell death in some of the cells lining the chest cavity (mesothelium comprised of mesothelial cells). These dying cells induce the neighboring cells to fill the holes and the adjacent cells proliferate or make more cells,1 like patching a hole on the elbow of a favorite…
  • Taking a Moment for Mesothelioma

    Emily Walsh
    7 Jul 2014 | 9:00 pm
    Mesothelioma is a rare and aggressive cancer that is primarily caused by asbestos exposure. To those who have never heard of the disease or have never known someone affected by it, mesothelioma may seem more like a foreign word than a real health danger. To help spread awareness about this disease, take a moment to read the key facts about mesothelioma:What is mesothelioma?It’s often thought that mesothelioma is a lung cancer, but it’s actually an aggressive cancer that affects the lining of the lungs, abdomen and heart. Mesothelioma is also quite rare with roughly 3,000 diagnoses each…
  • Advocate of the Month - July 2014

    MCA Warrior Stories
    30 Jun 2014 | 9:00 pm
    The Mesothelioma Cancer Alliance would like to thank Abigail Cashelle for sharing her story of how mesothelioma touched her life. Abigail is a twenty-something girl, living with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (a connective tissue disorder), and our Advocate of the Month for July. Living the rollercoaster of illness and medical treatment has taught her that what's hidden beneath the surface is what really counts. Abigail blogs at Hidden Courage.He was TallI only have a few memories of life before age 5 -- being chased by a goose, my best friend's family moving to Russia, and Matthew and Robert.
  • Senator Flake and the FACT Act: What is Fair?

    Barbara O'Brien
    26 Jun 2014 | 9:00 pm
    When U.S. Sen. Jeff Flake (R-AZ) introduced the Furthering Asbestos Claim Transparency (FACT) Act of 2014 (S. 2319) to the Senate on May 12, he claimed the bill was needed to prevent fraud. But there are open questions whether the fraud the bill addresses is real or imagined, and if it is real, whether there is another way to address the alleged fraud that wouldn’t hurt the very real victims of asbestos exposure.FACT is aimed at people who seek payments from trusts set up to compensate those whose health has been ruined by asbestos, particularly those suffering from mesothelioma. There are…
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  • Ten Unhealthy Breakfast Options

    Fredda Branyon
    16 Jul 2014 | 12:00 pm
    A healthy breakfast can set the tone for nutritious choices all day long. Consider these not-so-healthy breakfast foods sabotage. Low- or no-fiber cereals Source: change.org Cereal that is high in carbohydrates and sugar and low in fiber will causeq your blood sugar to spike, then quickly drop—which can lead to mid-morning cravings and moodiness. Nutritionist Mitzi Dulan, RD, author of The Pinterest Diet, recommends choosing cereal with at least 3 grams of fiber per serving. Boost the fiber further by adding berries, a sprinkle of wheat germ or flaxseed, or sliced almonds.   Breakfast…
  • Are E-Cigarettes Really Helping Smokers Quit? (Part 2)

    Fredda Branyon
    9 Jul 2014 | 12:00 am
    Image c/o Flickr A Olin The success that the e-cigarette manufacturers have attained over the past year has been tremendous. With $2 billion in sales, there seems to be no stopping the proliferation of e-cigarettes. However, the big question remains—can it replace tobacco smoking? This seems to be the question everybody is waiting to be answered. Will it be able to help smokers quit or become a device that just maintains a smoker’s habit? Since e-cigarettes have been around only for quite some time, there is only a limited amount of information available to consumers. The e-cigarette…
  • Are E-Cigarettes Really Helping Smokers Quit? (Part 1)

    Fredda Branyon
    2 Jul 2014 | 12:00 am
    image c/o Flickr Jano71 The e-cigarette business is an emerging industry, already gaining massive popularity among smokers and nonsmokers alike. Smokers are grabbing the chance to quit tobacco smoking and switch to a seemingly less harmful alternative. Non-smokers, on the other hand, are eager to try this tobacco-free smoke. Despite the growing success of the e-cigarette, its true effectiveness remains a big debate among health experts. According to some health professionals, there is a risk that promoting e-cigarettes can actually promote tobacco use, re-normalizing it. The U.S. Food and…
  • Seven Ways to Avoid Stress and Prevent Heart Disease (Part 2)

    Fredda Branyon
    25 Jun 2014 | 12:00 am
    Everyone feels stress in different amounts and reacts to it in different ways. How much stress you feel and how you react to it can lead to a wide variety of health problems — and that’s why it’s critical to know what you can do about it. When stress is constant, your body remains in high gear off and on for days or weeks at a time. Although the link between stress and heart disease isn’t clear, chronic stress may cause some people to drink too much alcohol which can increase your blood pressure and may damage the artery walls. Here’s the continuation of the previous article about…
  • Seven Ways to Avoid Stress and Prevent Heart Disease (Part 1)

    Fredda Branyon
    18 Jun 2014 | 12:00 am
    Stress is a normal part of life. But if left unmanaged, stress can lead to emotional, psychological, and even physical problems, including heart disease, high blood pressure, chest pains, or irregular heart beats. Even if you are healthy in every other aspects, especially when you’re the type who exercises often and eat vegetables regularly, stress can still affect your heart. When you’re under chronic stress, your immune system produces the stress hormones cortisol and adrenaline, and inflammatory proteins called cytokines, including interleukin-6. This chronic inflammation leads to…
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