Cancer

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  • Copper molecule shows promise in halting cancer spread

    Cancer / Oncology News From Medical News Today
    3 Mar 2015 | 3:00 am
    Researchers have made a copper molecule that binds to the DNA of cancer cells and stops them replicating. It also kills them more quickly than the widely used chemo drug cisplatin.
  • US spends more on cancer care, saves fewer lives than Western Europe

    Cancer News -- ScienceDaily
    2 Mar 2015 | 3:24 pm
    Despite sharp increases in spending on cancer treatment, cancer mortality rates in the United States have decreased only modestly since 1970, a study has found. "Our results suggest that cancer care in the U.S. did not always avert deaths compared to Western Europe and, when it did avert deaths, it often did so at substantial cost," explained an author. "The greatest number of deaths averted occurred in cancers for which decreasing mortality rates were more likely to be the result of successful prevention and screening rather than advancements in treatment."
  • Ultrasound lags behind MRI for supplemental breast cancer screening

    Breast Cancer News From Medical News Today
    3 Mar 2015 | 12:00 am
    Cancer screening of women with dense breast tissue is a subject of great interest to both the medical community and the press.
  • Black men are less willing to be investigated for possible prostate cancer than white men

    Prostate / Prostate Cancer News From Medical News Today
    2 Mar 2015 | 12:00 am
    The incidence of prostate cancer among men of Afro-Caribbean origin is higher than in white men, and their outcomes are worse.
  • Lives at risk as women are too scared to find out if they carry the 'faulty' BRCA cancer gene mutation

    Breast Cancer News From Medical News Today
    3 Mar 2015 | 2:00 am
    According to new research by leading research charity, Ovarian Cancer Action, a quarter of women say they would choose NOT to be tested for the BRCA gene mutation (which can lead to both breast and...
 
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    Cancer News -- ScienceDaily

  • Researchers investigate possible colon cancer risk for new generation of weight-loss drugs

    3 Mar 2015 | 9:38 am
    Gastric bypass and similar stomach-shrinking surgeries are a popular option for obese patients looking to lose weight or treat type 2 diabetes. While the surgeries have been linked to a decreased risk in many cancers, the single outlier is colon cancer. Scientists now present work in mice that could explain this association and raise safety concerns for a new generation of weight-loss drugs that mimic the biological after effects of these procedures.
  • Long-term follow-up of benign thyroid nodules shows favorable prognosis

    3 Mar 2015 | 9:37 am
    After five years of follow-up, a majority of asymptomatic, benign thyroid nodules exhibited no significant change in size, or actually decreased in size, and diagnoses of thyroid cancer were rare, according to a study.
  • MR spectroscopy shows precancerous breast changes in women with BRCA gene

    3 Mar 2015 | 4:54 am
    A magnetic resonance spectroscopy technique that monitors biochemical changes in tissue could improve the management of women at risk of breast cancer, according to a new study.
  • 'Cardiovascular revolution' has increased life expectancy in Spain

    3 Mar 2015 | 4:51 am
    Over the last century, life expectancy for Spaniards has increased by 40 years. A study highlights the main cause, since 1980, as being the reduced incidence of cardiovascular diseases while other pathologies, such as mental illnesses and certain types of cancer, have been seen to rise. The authors predict that the effects of the economic recession on mortality will show up in the long-term.
  • US spends more on cancer care, saves fewer lives than Western Europe

    2 Mar 2015 | 3:24 pm
    Despite sharp increases in spending on cancer treatment, cancer mortality rates in the United States have decreased only modestly since 1970, a study has found. "Our results suggest that cancer care in the U.S. did not always avert deaths compared to Western Europe and, when it did avert deaths, it often did so at substantial cost," explained an author. "The greatest number of deaths averted occurred in cancers for which decreasing mortality rates were more likely to be the result of successful prevention and screening rather than advancements in treatment."
 
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    Breast Cancer News -- ScienceDaily

  • MR spectroscopy shows precancerous breast changes in women with BRCA gene

    3 Mar 2015 | 4:54 am
    A magnetic resonance spectroscopy technique that monitors biochemical changes in tissue could improve the management of women at risk of breast cancer, according to a new study.
  • US spends more on cancer care, saves fewer lives than Western Europe

    2 Mar 2015 | 3:24 pm
    Despite sharp increases in spending on cancer treatment, cancer mortality rates in the United States have decreased only modestly since 1970, a study has found. "Our results suggest that cancer care in the U.S. did not always avert deaths compared to Western Europe and, when it did avert deaths, it often did so at substantial cost," explained an author. "The greatest number of deaths averted occurred in cancers for which decreasing mortality rates were more likely to be the result of successful prevention and screening rather than advancements in treatment."
  • 'Milk' protein that enables survival of the species discovered by researchers

    2 Mar 2015 | 9:32 am
    The protein MCL-1 is critical for keeping milk-producing cells alive and sustaining milk production in the breast, researchers have discovered. Without milk production, offspring cannot survive, making MCL-1 essential for survival of mammalian species.
  • Breakthrough in understanding how cancer cells metastasize

    27 Feb 2015 | 8:26 am
    A protein commonly found in human cells could be an important switch that activates cancer cell metastasis, according to a new study. The finding focuses attention on a biological mechanism that until now was largely overlooked. The discovery of the protein's effect significantly expands our understanding of epithelial cancers such as breast and lung cancer.
  • New breast cancer test links immune 'hotspots' to better survival

    27 Feb 2015 | 8:26 am
    Scientists have developed a new test that can predict the survival chances of women with breast cancer by analyzing images of 'hotspots' where there has been a fierce immune reaction to a tumor. Researchers used statistical software previously used in criminology studies of crime hotspots to track the extent to which the immune system was homing in and attacking breast cancer cells.
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    MD Anderson Cancer Center - News Releases

  • MD Anderson Study Shows Why Some Brain Cancers Resist Treatment

    2 Mar 2015 | 12:53 pm
    Scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center may have discovered why some brain cancer patients develop resistance to standard treatments including radiation and the chemotherapy agent temozolomide.
  • Anderson Algorithm increases surgical success with advanced ovarian cancer

    27 Feb 2015 | 8:48 am
    A surgical algorithm developed and implemented by ovarian cancer specialists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center dramatically increases the frequency of complete removal of all visible tumor - a milestone strongly tied to improved survival.
  • Christopher Logothetis honored with inaugural Finneran Family Prize

    27 Feb 2015 | 4:00 am
    The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center has awarded the inaugural Finneran Family Prize to Christopher Logothetis, M.D., chair and professor of Genitourinary Medical Oncology. The $50,000 cash award will be given annually to a deserving faculty member through the Finneran Family Endowment in Translational Research at MD Anderson.
  • Alejandro Contreras and Yun Wu receive Shirley Stein Scientific Endowed Research Award

    26 Feb 2015 | 12:00 pm
    The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center has awarded Alejandro Contreras, M.D., Ph.D., assistant professor of Pathology, and Yun Wu, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor of Pathology, the inaugural Shirley Stein Scientific Endowed Research Award.
  • Andrew Futreal receives Jack and Beverly Randall Prize

    26 Feb 2015 | 8:00 am
    The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center has awarded Andrew Futreal, Ph.D., professor of Genomic Medicine, the inaugural Jack and Beverly Randall Prize for Excellence in Cancer Research. Futreal is recognized internationally as a pioneer in large-scale systematic cancer genomics, which led to the identification of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 breast/ovarian cancer susceptibility genes, BRAF mutations in melanoma, ERBB2 mutations in non-small cell lung cancer and multiple new cancer genes in renal cell carcinoma. 
 
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    Prostate Cancer News -- ScienceDaily

  • Healthy-looking prostate cells mask cancer-causing mutations

    2 Mar 2015 | 9:29 am
    Prostate cells that look normal under the microscope may be hiding genetic mutations that could develop into cancer, prompting new ways to improve treatment for the disease, according to research. "We're finding new ways to detect precancerous cells, and this will give us the tools to prevent them becoming a threat in the future. This latest research provides powerful new insights into prostate cancer that we hope will help more men beat the disease," an author noted.
  • Black men less willing to be investigated for prostate cancer

    2 Mar 2015 | 4:13 am
    The incidence of prostate cancer among men of Afro-Caribbean origin is higher than in white men, they are more likely to be diagnosed as emergencies and their mortality rates are higher. Until now it has been unclear why these disappointing outcomes exist. To investigate the possible effects of patients' preferences and choices, a team of researchers carried out a study in more than 500 men attending general practices.
  • Interventional radiology offers new treatment for enlarged prostates

    2 Mar 2015 | 4:13 am
    Men with benign prostatic hyperplasia, a condition in which the prostate is enlarged but not cancerous, have a new, breakthrough treatment option.
  • New health care delivery model for prostate cancer care results in better patient outcomes

    24 Feb 2015 | 12:48 pm
    A comprehensive, population-based regional health care management program for men with prostate cancer has led to improved outcomes, according to a study. "While prostate cancer is the second-leading cause of cancer death among men, providing high quality care for men living with prostate cancer presents a challenge," said the study's lead author. "Increased survival rates have made prostate cancer similar to other chronic conditions, which means we need ongoing management strategies that span the natural history and clinical course of the disease."
  • Androgen receptor abnormality may not be associated with primary resistance to taxane chemotherapy

    24 Feb 2015 | 6:17 am
    Findings from a small prospective study suggest that androgen receptor V7 (or AR-V7) status does not significantly affect response to taxane chemotherapy in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Treatment outcomes were largely similar for the 17 patients with AR-V7-positive prostate cancer and the 20 patients with AR-V7-negative disease included in this analysis.
 
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    Lung Cancer News -- ScienceDaily

  • Restoring ability to halt cell division may protect lung cells from cancer

    2 Mar 2015 | 9:33 am
    A novel role for a signaling mechanism in lung cells that permanently places them into a state of suspended animation called senescence has been identified by a team of researchers. Alive but unable to do much of anything, including divide, senescent cells cannot become cancerous. Drugs that can induce senescence through this signaling pathway would represent a new class of chemotherapy.
  • Blood samples as surrogates for tumor biopsies in patients with lung cancer

    26 Feb 2015 | 9:24 am
    A study examined the feasibility of using circulating free DNA from blood samples of patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer as a surrogate for tumor biopsies to determine tumor-causing epidermal growth factor receptor mutations and then correlate that with expected patient outcomes, according to a new study.
  • 'Patchwork' ovarian cancer more deadly

    24 Feb 2015 | 11:29 am
    The most common type of ovarian cancer is more deadly if it consists of a patchwork of different groups of cells, according to a new study. Serous ovarian cancers containing a variety of genetically-different cells were more likely to become resistant to treatment and come back again than cancers made of more similar cells. Women with this type of tumor also died sooner than those with less varied tumors.
  • Decline in smoking rates may increase lung cancer mortality due to inadequate screening guidelines

    24 Feb 2015 | 8:29 am
    A decline in smoking rates may mean that many people who could have benefited from early detection of lung cancer are dying because they don’t qualify for low-dose CT scans, according to a group of researchers.
  • Need for more sensitive lung cancer screening criteria, study suggests

    24 Feb 2015 | 8:29 am
    An analysis of lung cancer incidence and screening found a decline in the proportion of patients with lung cancer meeting high-risk screening criteria, suggesting that an increasing number of patients with lung cancer would not have been candidates for screening, according to a study.
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    my Breast Cancer blog

  • Cancer Messed With My Mind

    Jacki
    16 Feb 2015 | 8:13 pm
    Today, I sat in a chair with a microphone in hand in the front of a classroom filled with 100-plus first-year University of Florida medical students. Dr. Averbuch sat in the other chair, sort of facing me and sort of facing the students whose eyes focused on both of us. Dr. Lynch, my oncologist and […]
  • My Words Are In Mumbai

    Jacki
    10 Dec 2014 | 7:56 am
    On November 12, 2014, I received this email: Hi. I am a journalist from Mumbai (formerly Bombay), India. I have followed your blog for years. It wasn’t by chance that I saw it. Since my sister was first diagnosed and passed away three years after complications from breast cancer in 2000, I have been reading […]
  • You Must Read “Berlin Dancer,” Yo! (GIVEAWAY)

    Jacki
    4 Dec 2014 | 11:38 am
    I could not get enough of the TV show “Breaking Bad.” I loved everything about it. (Well, not the reminder that meth and murder are real problems in real life.) I was captivated by the characters, the stories within stories, the edge-of-my-seat moments, the humor. Yo. I binge watched that show whenever I could, although […]
  • From Breast Cancer to Berlin Dancer

    Jacki
    30 Nov 2014 | 11:03 am
    One of my badass breast cancer survivor friends wrote a book. WROTE A BOOK. (Which, in Kindle version, happens to cost just .99 cents right now.) My true test of a good book is making it through the first few pages without putting it down. Cindy Hurst—your book has passed my test, and I cannot wait […]
  • TEN Whole Years

    Jacki
    23 Nov 2014 | 10:35 pm
    Ten years ago TODAY, on November 24, my phone rang at 10:00 a.m., and the doctor who had performed my breast biopsy the day before told me that my pathology report was back. “Unfortunately, cancer cells were found,” he said. TEN YEARS. I am lucky.
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    Colon Cancer News -- ScienceDaily

  • Adults wtih disabilities screened for cancer less often

    26 Feb 2015 | 3:35 pm
    Adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities are much less likely to be screened for colorectal cancer, research shows. "As individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities live longer, their risk of developing chronic conditions like cancer increases. Suboptimal screening may contribute to a greater cancer burden in this population," says one researcher.
  • Tumor location in colorectal cancer may influence survival

    24 Feb 2015 | 2:21 pm
    The two halves of the human colon have different embryonic origins and gene expression patterns, and these differences may also play a role in cancer biology, according to a study. Over the three studies, about 70% of patients had left-sided primary tumors and had better survival outcomes than those with right-sided tumors.
  • Discovery of genetic fingerprint of aggressive colon tumors

    23 Feb 2015 | 9:25 am
    About 40–50% of all colorectal patients relapse in the form of metastasis. In the last three years, several molecular classifications have been proposed to identify colorectal cancer patients at risk of relapse. Scientists now explain why these classifications work and reveal, in fact, that they can be simplified and improved by looking exclusively at the genes that are expressed in the tissue around the tumor, known as the stroma or tumor microenvironment.
  • Bacteria protect intestinal tumor model from being killed by immune cells

    11 Feb 2015 | 3:30 pm
    Bacteria that are commonly found in the mouth are often abundant in patients with colon cancer, but the potential role these microbes play in tumor development has not been clear. A new study reveals that the oral pathogen Fusobacterium nucleatum protects a variety of tumor cells from being killed by immune cells. The findings could open new avenues for the treatment of cancer in human patients.
  • Origins of colorectal cancer tumor cells traced

    9 Feb 2015 | 9:28 am
    For the first time, cancer researchers have traced the origins of colorectal cancer cells, finding important clues to why tumor cells become 'good' or 'bad,' with the potential of stopping them before they start.
 
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    EurekAlert! - Cancer

  • Flower-like magnetic nanoparticles target difficult tumors

    2 Mar 2015 | 9:00 pm
    (American Institute of Physics) Thanks to the work of an interdisciplinary team of researchers at the Dartmouth Center of Nanotechnology Excellence, funded by the National Institutes of Health, the next-generation magnetic nanoparticles may soon be treating deep-seated and difficult-to-reach tumors within the human body.
  • Brain tumor patients fare better with private insurance, new study finds

    2 Mar 2015 | 9:00 pm
    (University of Florida) Brain tumor patients who are uninsured or use Medicaid stay hospitalized longer and develop more medical complications than those with private insurance, University of Florida Health researchers have found.
  • UTMB study shows testosterone being prescribed when not medically needed

    2 Mar 2015 | 9:00 pm
    (University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston) A new study by the University of Texas Medical Branch found that 20 percent of men were prescribed testosterone despite having normal testosterone levels based on the Endocrine Society's guidelines. The study also found that 39 percent of new testosterone users did not have a prostate cancer screening during the year before treatment and 56 percent were not screened during the year after starting treatment.
  • Long-term follow-up of benign thyroid nodules shows favorable prognosis

    2 Mar 2015 | 9:00 pm
    (The JAMA Network Journals) After five years of follow-up, a majority of asymptomatic, benign thyroid nodules exhibited no significant change in size, or actually decreased in size, and diagnoses of thyroid cancer were rare, according to a study in the March 3 issue of JAMA.
  • Researchers investigate possible colon cancer risk for new generation of weight-loss drugs

    2 Mar 2015 | 9:00 pm
    (Cell Press) Gastric bypass and similar stomach-shrinking surgeries are a popular option for obese patients looking to lose weight or treat type 2 diabetes. While the surgeries have been linked to a decreased risk in many cancers, the single outlier is colon cancer. In Cell Metabolism, scientists present work in mice that could explain this association and raise safety concerns for a new generation of weight-loss drugs that mimic the biological after effects of these procedures.
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    Cancer Treatment

  • Just watch me!

    Carolines Breast Cancer Blog
    3 Mar 2015 | 3:21 am
    My co-workers wonder why I go to the gym - they are not gym people - as I have so many ailments.read more
  • Farydak Approved for Multiple Myeloma

    Ross Bonander
    2 Mar 2015 | 10:10 am
    The Food and Drug Administration last week granted accelerated approval for Farydak (panobinostat) for the treatment of some patients with multiple myeloma. Multiple myeloma is a blood cancer that develops from plasma cells found in bone marrow. According to the National Cancer Institute, approximately 21,700 Americans are diagnosed with multiple myeloma and 10,710 die from the disease annually. read more
  • A cheap little pill

    Carolines Breast Cancer Blog
    2 Mar 2015 | 3:51 am
    I have often blogged about the high prices of medications because I think some of them are just astronomical and are partly priced based on what their manufacturers think is something along the line of the value to patients. If a pill costs $100,000 and will make you get a break from your ailment, would you be willing to pay it (with help from your insurance company)?read more
  • The killer bacteria

    Carolines Breast Cancer Blog
    1 Mar 2015 | 7:20 am
    There is killer bacteria at your doctor's office, in the hospital scope, in the air, on the ground, and on the nine things in your house dirtier than a toilet seat. All those unvaccinated people are going to spread measles and other diseases. People with compromised immune systems should take extra precautions to avoid these bacteria. Blah, blah, blah.And how am I supposed to avoid doctor's offices anyway? I am a regular visitor. There has been so much new recently on all these topics. And I couldn't care less.read more
  • Time to change the guidelines

    Carolines Breast Cancer Blog
    28 Feb 2015 | 5:57 am
    Medical guidelines are put in place so there are fewer questions about what are correct tests and treatments for patients. They can be anything from - do you need stitches for that cut or do you need an EKG? The criteria used can be anything from age, general health, behaviors, diet, and much more.Behavior is a big one. This is drinking, smoking, eating patterns, exercise, etc. But if behaviors of the general population change, the guidelines need to be modified to adapt.read more
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    CancerHawk

  • 2015 Clean Fifteen Is Here

    Robyn
    27 Feb 2015 | 6:39 am
    The Environmental Working Group (EWG), the nation’s leading environmental health research and advocacy organization, created the Shopper’s Guide to Pesticides in Produce.  This guide, which is updated each year, highlights the cleanest and dirtiest conventionally-raised fruits and vegetables.  Earlier this week, I wrote about the Dirty Dozen, or the 12 most pesticide-laden foods.  To see this article, click HERE.  Today I am writing about the the 15 least pesticide-laden foods which are known as the “Clean Fifteen™″.  According to the EWG, If the fruit or veggie is…
  • 2015 Dirty Dozen Is Here

    Robyn
    25 Feb 2015 | 8:18 am
    Did you know that nearly two-thirds of the 3,015 produce samples tested by the U.S. Department of Agriculture contained pesticide residues? Yikes! Did you know that 99 percent of apple samples, 98 percent of peaches, and 97 percent of nectarines tested positive for at least one pesticide residue? Yikes! Or that a single sample of cherry tomatoes, nectarines, peaches, imported snap peas and strawberries showed 13 different pesticides apiece? Yikes! Many people believe that the pesticides used to grow conventional or non-organic produce may have played a role in their cancer and that…
  • Choose Hope & You Can’t Go Wrong

    Robyn
    24 Feb 2015 | 4:47 pm
  • 10 Things Every Cancer Patient Should Know About Chemo

    Robyn Stoller
    22 Feb 2015 | 5:40 pm
    Copyright: / 123RF Stock Photo Everyday Health is one of my favorite, go-to sites for reliable health and wellness advice.  I just read a FANTASTIC article written by Lisa C. Richardson, MD, MPH for Everyday Healthon preventing infectionthat EVERY cancer patient (and caregiver too) should read.  Simply put, when you’re on chemo, you are at a higher risk of infection.  And infection can have serious consequences to your health.  I’ve reposted Dr. Richardson’s “10 Things Every Cancer Should Know About Chemo” below: “Neutropenia means you have a…
  • Financial Assistance for Families Living in the Greater PA Area

    Robyn Stoller
    17 Feb 2015 | 6:54 pm
    Bringing Hope Home provides financial and emotional support to families with cancer of any age, gender, race and cancer type in the Greater Philadelphia area. These one-time grants can be used to pay for essential household bills such as rent, mortgage, electric, gas, oil, water, phone, transportation and groceries.  Grant money is paid directly to services or vendors. No grant money is given directly to the nominee. To qualify for the Light of Hope Family Grant Program, applicants must: • Live in the Greater Philadelphia geographic area.  This includes the following counties…
 
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    Cancerwise | Cancer blog from MD Anderson Cancer Center

  • How CrossFit helped me get in shape after testicular cancer

    Cancerwise Blogger
    2 Mar 2015 | 5:30 am
    By Shane Scott I have always been an athletic guy. I played football in high school and college. But after my testicular cancer treatment, I was overweight, and I wasn't leading a healthy lifestyle. I knew I needed to get stronger to prevent my cancer from coming back. CrossFit turned out to be exactly what I needed. It helped me do a lot more than just get back in shape. It helped me find me confidence and connect with others.Starting CrossFit after testicular cancer treatmentMy testicular cancer treatment included three cycles of chemotherapy and a surgery. It was tough, but following the…
  • 10 ways to ease stress and anxiety during cancer treatment

    Cancerwise Blogger
    27 Feb 2015 | 5:30 am
    Whether you have an upcoming CT scan or are expecting news from your doctor, waiting can cause anxiety, worry and stress. You might have trouble sleeping or feel impatient with your loved ones. All of this is completely normal. Here at MD Anderson, we call that scanxiety. The good news is there are many ways to deal with scanxiety. To help make the waiting game a little easier, we asked our Facebook community how they cope with the stress or anxiety before an important scan or appointment. Here's what they had to say: Pray. Many of our patients and caregivers said they found comfort in…
  • Why I celebrate 'cancerversaries' after TNBC

    Cancerwise Blogger
    26 Feb 2015 | 5:30 am
    By Bree SandlinIn the summer of 2012, I was diagnosed with stage three triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). I was 37 years old and had 5-year-old twin boys, one with severe cerebral palsy. Having a child with special needs, my husband and I were no strangers to hospitals and doctors. Despite those experiences, nothing could have prepared us for the words "you have cancer."  The next year of my life was one of the most difficult, and as I was soon to learn, one of the most inspiring. For my TNBC treatment, I underwent six months of chemotherapy, a bilateral mastectomy, an oophorectomy…
  • How my cancer journey became my family's cancer journey

    Cancerwise Blogger
    25 Feb 2015 | 5:30 am
    By Jaymee FiskumI wasn't the only one diagnosed with anaplastic large T cell lymphoma small cell variant (ALCL) in May 2013. My entire family took on my cancer journey as if it was their own. Because of them, I consider myself lucky -- as weird as it may sound. I have so much support in my life. It motivated me to fight harder. I couldn't let myself down, but I couldn't let all of them down either. How my family helped me cope with ALCLEach one of my family members played a huge part in my cancer journey. After my doctor told me I had ALCL. In September 2013, I began six cycles of…
  • How our Suspicion of Cancer Clinic helps patients

    Cancerwise Blogger
    24 Feb 2015 | 5:30 am
    By Angela YoungWhen Samuel Loftin's blood work showed an unusual level of liver enzymes,  a gastroenterologist near his Alabama home recommended an ultrasound of his liver. When that test was negative, the doctor ordered an MRI, which showed two suspicious liver lesions, as well as an abnormality in his spine. Samuel's doctor said it was probably cancer and that spots on his spine meant it might have spread to his vertebrae. Samuel was referred to a nearby cancer center."My doctor set up the appointment, but it was three weeks away. I just couldn't wait that long," Samuel says.He called…
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    Mesothelioma Cancer Alliance Blog

  • Breathing New Life Into Lung Leavin' Day

    Heather Von St. James
    25 Feb 2015 | 9:00 pm
    Every year following Lung Leavin’ Day, I write a recap of the evening. This year I wanted to do something a little different. I know the event has a huge effect on people, and in the last couple of years people have shared their feelings about the night with me. I thought I would ask a few friends about their thoughts on the tradition and share them with you.Fear means different things to different people. To some, fear manifests as anger. For others, fear is sorrow. For each person, identifying their fears is an intensely personal part of Lung Leavin’ Day. To give those fears a voice,…
  • CD10 Enzyme Joins Factors That Affect Prognosis of Mesothelioma

    Staff
    18 Feb 2015 | 9:00 pm
    Doctors use information about each case of mesothelioma to help guide the treatment of each patient. Most commonly, doctors look at how far the mesothelioma has spread which is measured in the tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage and the type of tumor cell --epithelioid, biphasic, and sarcomatoid. However, even the same type of mesothelioma—epithelioid— can vary in its rate of growth or aggressiveness. Thus, other factors in mesothelioma must affect its aggressiveness. Oncology surgeons and pathologists from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York recently have found that an…
  • Discovering the Origins of Mesothelioma

    Dr. Raphael Bueno
    16 Feb 2015 | 9:00 pm
    Research is at the heart of the International Mesothelioma Program (IMP) at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) in Boston. By studying mesothelioma tumors, our team of physician-scientists has made incredible strides in the search for mutations that can lead to mesothelioma. Their findings support the current understanding that mesothelioma begins with exposure to an irritant—usually asbestos—that triggers a cascade of genetic changes resulting in the disease.IMP researchers at BWH recently used a new technology called High Throughput Sequencing to examine the entire genome of individual…
  • Cancer and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder: 3 Tips to Help with Risk and Symptoms

    Jillian McKee
    12 Feb 2015 | 9:00 pm
    A cancer diagnosis triggers fear and worry in most, if not all people. Many new terms and treatment options are provided to you at diagnosis. For some people, it can become overwhelming. To help alleviate these feelings in the beginning of your cancer journey, bring a friend or family member to your appointments to help understand the information, ask questions, and take notes. Make sure you ask questions until you understand the answers and the options you have during your treatment.About 3 of every 4 people with a cancer diagnosis can process the information without feeling totally…
  • Advocate of the Month - February 2015

    MCA Warrior Stories
    1 Feb 2015 | 9:00 pm
    The Mesothelioma Cancer Alliance would like to welcome Tanita Taylor to our blog as February's Advocate of the Month. Tanita is a proud mother of 2 and shares her experiences on her blog Just Motherhood. Today, Tanita shares the story of how mesothelioma affected her grandmother's life and her family's life.I want to say thank you for letting me share my story about my granny. Going through photos and speaking to my mum about her has been extremely surreal but also therapeutic. I’ve faced many emotions, and through this experience I’ve learned to not let a circumstance shape you; instead,…
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    FreddaBranyon.com

  • Stress Management Checklist: Ways how to get rid stress

    primeviewllc
    23 Feb 2015 | 4:55 pm
    Image Source: Pexels Our day to day activities present opportunities for us to suffer from stress – that’s a given. Stress is defined as “a state of mental or emotional strain or tension resulting from adverse or very demanding circumstances.”. When we overexert ourselves, or we are faced with circumstances we can’t seem to handle or overwhelm us, then we feel stressed. Managing stress is easy if you know what to do specifically when stress arrives right straight through your busy schedule. Learn how to manage your stress. Here are some ways to relieve yourself from stress.
  • Last Week of February is National Eating Disorders Awareness Week

    primeviewllc
    16 Feb 2015 | 5:52 pm
    Image Source: Pexels This February, the annual National Eating Disorders Awareness Week will be celebrated to commemorate the awareness and information dissemination against eating disorder. This awareness campaign aims to equip the people on the warning signs and treatment options for eating disorders as well as the support the patient can get from people around them such as family and friends. This disorder mostly affects adolescents and the young women. In this period or age, they tend to keep and maintain a body figure in which even the food they eat is sacrificed and being affected.
  • Menstrual Cramps? How to deal with it the natural way

    primeviewllc
    9 Feb 2015 | 4:38 pm
    Its the time of the month where girls have to pay attention to their monthly but not that friendly, visitor. Menstruation always comes with its best pal, menstrual cramps. Many women experience this with a throbbing pain in the lower abdomen. Majority of women experience the immense  pain of these cramps during their growing or puberty stage. These cramps can affect a woman in such a way as to cause you to back away from the day’s activity or even worse, you can’t even move because of the pain it brings. Dysmenorrhea is present before or during and sometimes after the menstrual period.
  • Home Remedy Tips: How to lose belly fat

    primeviewllc
    2 Feb 2015 | 5:02 pm
    Image Source: Pexels Do you notice a flab of fat slipping out whenever you’re wearing your favorite pair of jeans or your favorite body con dress? Some people are quite embarrassed about this excessive fat on their body, and who wouldn’t? Belly fats are caused by many factors such as consumption of large amounts of junk foods and bad lifestyle habits. It is also genetically inherited but most of the time it’s really the former factors than the latter. Well then, does having a flat tummy  always been your dream? Here are all home remedy items available in your own cupboards and…
  • 5 Foods that Trigger Inflammation

    primeviewllc
    22 Dec 2014 | 12:43 am
    When you’re trying to manage inflammation or completely avoid it from happening, these are the 5 types of foods you must avoid. Sugar I would certainly agree that it is really hard to resist a sweet treat thus the next thing i’m about to say can make you watch your sugar intake. Sugar can cause inflammation. Not just simple inflammation but a serious one. Sugar triggers the release of inflammatory messengers. Better reduce your consumption and choose a healthier option to your “go to” meals. Alcohol Aside from being a big burden to the liver, alcohol has high content of sugar…
 
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    City of Hope Breakthroughs

  • Cancer Insights: The potential of CAR-T cells to fight prostate cancer

    Sumanta Kumar Pal, M.D.
    3 Mar 2015 | 6:00 am
    Pick up any biotech industry report and you’re guaranteed to come across one term repeatedly – CAR-T therapy. A fierce competition is now underway to bring CAR-T treatments to market – several companies (Juno, Novartis, Kite and Cellectis, to name a few) have major stakes in the race. I’ve found the CAR-T buzz has also penetrated the clinic — not a day goes by that I don’t have a conversation with a patient regarding this emerging technology. Sumanta Kumar Pal explains the potential of CAR-T cell therapies for prostate cancer. So what is CAR-T? Essentially, it’s an…
  • Evening of Remembrance: Coping tips for families who have lost loved ones to cancer

    Tracy Schuster
    2 Mar 2015 | 6:00 am
    City of Hope will host its inaugural Evening of Remembrance on March 12, 2015. Patients undergoing treatment at City of Hope know they will be receiving the best medical care available, that their treatment will be delivered with compassion and that their care will extend to their families. “When we treat a patient here, we treat a family,” says Jo Ann S. Namm, child life manager and specialist in the Department of Supportive Care Medicine. Sometimes, however, a patient dies. When this happens, City of Hope’s care for the family does not stop. City of Hope’s commitment to the…
  • Get the facts about colorectal cancer. Here are 31 (one a day) for March

    Sayeh Hirmand
    1 Mar 2015 | 6:00 am
    March is Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month. Thanks to better treatments and increased screening, more people are surviving the disease today. Did you know that colorectal cancer equally affects men and women? Or that it’s the third-leading cause of cancer death in the U.S.? Most important, did you know that colorectal cancer is very treatable and highly curable if detected early? If you didn’t know these facts, it’s time to learn. More and more people are surviving colorectal cancer through better treatments and increased screening, so getting the screening – a very…
  • Celebrating the Lunar New Year: City of Hope charges forward

    Fran Rizzi
    26 Feb 2015 | 3:30 pm
    City of Hope patients and physicians welcome the New Year of the Ram in L.A.’s annual Lunar New Year parade To celebrate the beginning of Lunar New  Year 2015, City of Hope honored not just a new lunar calendar, but also the diversity of the community it serves. On Jan. 21, as tens of thousands of people celebrated Lunar New Year (and the arrival of the Year of the Ram) in the streets of L.A.’s Chinatown, City of Hope did so as well – with its own ram’s head-bedecked float. Riding atop the float were two City of Hope patients and their families, as well as three City…
  • Charlie Rose: Experts talk of cancer breakthroughs and ‘tyranny of time’

    Nicole White
    26 Feb 2015 | 1:30 pm
    Charlie Rose interviews, from left, City of Hope’s Stephen J. Forman, Steven T. Rosen and City of Hope President and CEO Robert W. Stone. The breakthroughs that have revolutionized cancer treatment, transforming cancer in many cases to a very manageable and even curable disease, started out as just ideas. “I will often tell patients there’s no therapy we’re using to help them that wasn’t derived from somebody’s idea in some laboratory, working late into the night,” said Stephen J. Forman, M.D., Francis & Kathleen McNamara Distinguished Chair in Hematology and…
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    Living Fit, Healthy and Happy (SM)

  • Talenti Gelato & Sorbetto Is Recalling A Limited Number Of Talenti Gelato & Sorbetto Sea Salt Caramel Gelato Due to Undeclared Peanut

    healthy_blogging
    2 Mar 2015 | 10:09 am
    by Joseph According to a posting on the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) website, Talenti® Gelato & Sorbetto, a Unilever company, is voluntarily recalling a limited number of Talenti® Gelato & Sorbetto Sea Salt Caramel Gelato because of undeclared peanuts. According to the posting, the affected product was distributed in one pint (473 mL) clear plastic jars marked with a unit UPC of 8685200024 located on the side of the jar. The product also has a best by date of 05/19/2016 located on the bottom of the jar. No other best buy dates are affected. The product was distributed…
  • Fairway Brand Raw Hazelnuts (Filberts) Recalled Because of Possible Salmonella Contamination

    healthy_blogging
    28 Feb 2015 | 12:08 pm
    by Joseph According to a posting on the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) website, Fairway “Like No Other Market” of New York, NY, is recalling Fairway brand Raw Hazelnuts (Filberts), because it has the potential to be contaminated with Salmonella bacteria. The product is packaged in clear, plastic cello bags of varying weights, each weighing less than one pound. The product bears Item Code 228119 XXXXXX. According to the company, they are recalling all “SELL BY” Date codes of May 15, 2015 and earlier. The Fairway brand Raw Hazelnuts (Filberts) were distributed to Fairway stores in…
  • The Nut Case

    healthy_blogging
    28 Feb 2015 | 4:00 am
    The Nut Case Submitted by: Sandra Prior Nuts have long had a bad rap for being high in fat and calories, prompting weight-conscious bodybuilders to relegate nuts to their lists of forbidden foods. But as researchers take a closer look at walnuts, almonds, and other nuts, they're discovering these delicious, crunchy foods are packed with vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. And that fat we were so wary of? Turns out it's good for our hearts - and our bodybuilding. That was the conclusion of the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), which released a qualified health claim in 2003 that…
  • Running: Training Tips

    healthy_blogging
    27 Feb 2015 | 4:00 am
    Running: Training Tips Submitted by: Sandra Prior How can I avoid turning an ankle during trail runs? If you spend much time training on trails, wear shoes with thick soles and plenty of support, which will stabilize your footstrike and help prevent an ankle turn on rough surfaces. Trail shoes are designed for this; some running shoes will also suffice. Also, always keep your eyes on the trail immediately ahead so you can adapt your stride to any sudden terrain changes. And on the downhills, slightly shorten your stride. This will help you maintain better control and balance. Can I...
  • Quit Smoking Is The Way To Good Health

    healthy_blogging
    26 Feb 2015 | 4:00 am
    Quit Smoking Is The Way To Good Health Submitted by: Raymond Geok Seng Lee Cigarette smoking kills approximately 300,000 in the United States each year, and most of these people are seniors. Lung cancer and emphysema are the best-known miserable outcomes. However, accelerated development of atherosclerosis is the most important problem resulting from smoking. This results in heart attacks and strokes, heart pains, leg pains, and many other problems. Pipe and cigar smoking do not have the pulmonary consequences that cigarette smoking does, but they do predispose to cancer of the lips, and…
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