Cancer

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  • Combating Chemotherapy's Side Effects With Nutrition

    Mesothelioma Cancer Alliance Blog
    Jennifer Lucarelli
    25 Aug 2014 | 9:00 pm
    Many mesothelioma patients choose to undergo chemotherapy as part of their cancer treatment. Unfortunately, chemotherapy may cause loss of appetite, nausea, sore mouths, and fatigue; often, chemotherapy leads to weight loss. While many patients find it difficult to eat before and after chemotherapy treatments, nutritious food can be a powerful tool that mesothelioma patients may use to combat cancer and the side-effects of chemotherapy. Rebecca Katz, author of The Cancer-Fighting Kitchen and One Bite at a Time cookbooks, provides cancer patients and their families with nutritious, wholesome…
  • Cellular biology of colorectal cancer: New Insight

    Colon Cancer News -- ScienceDaily
    21 Aug 2014 | 7:24 am
    A new role for the protein adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) in suppressing colorectal cancer -- the second-leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the U.S. -- has been outlined by new research, providing a better understanding of the illness. "It's not widely appreciated, but there is still plenty of cell growth going on in adults, with the colon being a good example," a researcher said. "On average, we shed and replace about 70 pounds of intestinal tissue annually, so you can imagine that this process requires exquisite control to prevent tumor formation."
  • What you should know about bladder cancer

    Cancerwise | Cancer blog from MD Anderson Cancer Center
    Laura Nathan-Garner
    26 Aug 2014 | 5:30 am
    This year, nearly 75,000 people will be diagnosed with bladder cancer, according to the American Cancer Society. The vast majority of people diagnosed with this disease are white men over age 55, but bladder cancer can -- and does -- affect men and women of all ages and races. For many, blood in the urine will be the first tell-tale bladder cancer symptom. But many patients don't come to MD Anderson until their disease is late-stage and the bladder cancer has spread. And that, says, Arlene Siefker-Radtke, M.D., associate professor in Genitourinary Medical Oncology, can make it harder to…
  • Some women still don’t underststand 'overdiagnosis' risk in breast screening

    Breast Cancer News -- ScienceDaily
    29 Aug 2014 | 5:39 am
    A third of women who are given information about the chance of ‘overdiagnosis’ through the breast screening programs may not fully understand the risks involved, according to research. Overdiagnosis happens because some breast cancers grow so slowly that it would take more than a lifetime for them to threaten a woman's health. For every life that is saved through screening, researchers estimate that around three women will be overdiagnosed with breast cancer.
  • Men who exercise less more likely to wake up to urinate

    Prostate Cancer News -- ScienceDaily
    28 Aug 2014 | 8:01 am
    Men who are physically active are at lower risk of nocturia (waking up at night to urinate), according to a study. Nocturia is the most common and bothersome lower urinary tract symptom in men. Causes include overproduction of urine, low bladder capacity and sleep disturbances. Nocturia increases with age, and is estimated to occur in more than 50 percent of men 45 and older.
 
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    Cancer News -- ScienceDaily

  • Understanding, improving body's fight against pathogens

    2 Sep 2014 | 8:50 am
    The crucial role of two signalling molecules, DOK3 and SHP1, in the development and production of plasma cells has been uncovered by researchers. These discoveries advance the understanding of plasma cells and the antibody response, and may lead to optimization of vaccine development and improved treatment for patients with autoimmune diseases such as lupus and tumors such as multiple myeloma.
  • Invisible blood in urine may indicate bladder cancer

    1 Sep 2014 | 6:07 am
    One in 60 people over the age of 60 who had invisible blood in their urine -- identified by their GP testing their urine -- transpired to have bladder cancer, researchers report. The figure was around half of those who had visible blood in their urine -- the best known indicator of bladder cancer. However, it was still higher than figures for other potential symptoms of bladder cancer that warrant further investigation.
  • Carcinogenic role of protein in liver decoded

    1 Sep 2014 | 6:03 am
    The human protein EGFR controls cell growth. It has mutated in case of many cancer cells or exists in excessive numbers. For this reason it serves as a point of attack for target-oriented therapies. A study group has now discovered that the risk of this protein does not -- as previously assumed -- depend on its presence within the tumor cell, but rather from its activity in the cells adjacent to the tumor.
  • Preventing cancer from forming 'tentacles' stops dangerous spread

    29 Aug 2014 | 2:54 pm
    'Invadopodia' play a key role in the spread of cancer, a team of researchers reports. The study shows preventing these tentacle-like structures from forming can stop the spread of cancer entirely.
  • 'K-to-M' Histone Mutations: How Repressing Repressors May Drive Tissue-Specific Cancers

    29 Aug 2014 | 7:32 am
    The first animal model created to assess the molecular effects of two different histone H3.3 mutations in the fruit fly Drosophila strongly suggests that these mutations actually could drive cancer and identifies interacting partners and pathways that could be targeted for the treatment of cancer.
 
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    Breast Cancer News -- ScienceDaily

  • Some women still don’t underststand 'overdiagnosis' risk in breast screening

    29 Aug 2014 | 5:39 am
    A third of women who are given information about the chance of ‘overdiagnosis’ through the breast screening programs may not fully understand the risks involved, according to research. Overdiagnosis happens because some breast cancers grow so slowly that it would take more than a lifetime for them to threaten a woman's health. For every life that is saved through screening, researchers estimate that around three women will be overdiagnosed with breast cancer.
  • Circulating tumor cell clusters more likely to cause metastasis than single cells

    28 Aug 2014 | 10:55 am
    Circulating tumor cell (CTC) clusters -- clumps of from two to 50 tumor cells that break off a primary tumor and are carried through the bloodstream -- appear to be much more likely to cause metastasis than are single CTCs, according to a study.
  • Better classification to improve treatments for breast cancer

    27 Aug 2014 | 5:36 pm
    Breast cancer can be classified into ten different subtypes, and scientists have developed a tool to identify which is which. This new research could improve treatments and targeting of treatments for the disease, they say.
  • Symptoms after breast cancer surgery need to be treated on an individual basis

    26 Aug 2014 | 5:57 am
    For those affected, breast cancer is a dramatic diagnosis. Patients often have to endure chemotherapy and surgery, which, depending on the individual scenario, may mean breast conserving surgery or breast removal—mastectomy. In the aftermath, many women experience symptoms such as pain, fatigue/exhaustion, or sleep disturbances. However, the symptoms are highly individual, researchers state.
  • New biomarker highly promising for predicting breast cancer outcomes

    25 Aug 2014 | 3:58 pm
    A protein named p66ShcA shows promise as a biomarker to identify breast cancers with poor prognoses, according to research. The ability to predict prognosis is critical to management of treatment. A patient with a good prognosis can be spared aggressive treatment, with its oft-unpleasant side effects. But failure to apply aggressive treatment to an aggressive tumor can lead to death.
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    Artsy Asylum

  • Went To The Gym For The First Time Today

    admin
    1 Sep 2014 | 11:30 am
    I must confess I’m not exactly the slimmest girl on the block. I’m not chubby either, don’t get me wrong. However… we do have a slight tendency towards becoming slightly obese over a long period of time in our family. I see it as a genetic trait. My mom has it, my dad has it. Even my sister has it. And I have it too. I eat healthy foods most of the time, but still I gain weight when I’m not exercising at the same time. I suppose those few chunks of chocolate that I have per week are really adding up to the total calorie count. Today, I hit the gym together with a…
  • Welcome To My New Website, The Artsiest Asylum On The Net!

    admin
    26 Aug 2014 | 4:12 am
    Hello world, my name is Amber! This is my very first blog. I’ve never really written anything on the web before. Well, except maybe on Facebook. But I would hardly count that as publishing anything worhtwhile. A friend of mine has helped me set up this website, because I couldn’t do it when I was going at it alone. I was looking for a good domain name and came up with this one. Turns out it was just expiring. It used to belong to a woman named Susan Reynolds, who had now forwarded it to her new blog. I’ve taken the liberty of reading some of her writing. Susan Reynolds has…
 
 
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    Prostate Cancer News -- ScienceDaily

  • Men who exercise less more likely to wake up to urinate

    28 Aug 2014 | 8:01 am
    Men who are physically active are at lower risk of nocturia (waking up at night to urinate), according to a study. Nocturia is the most common and bothersome lower urinary tract symptom in men. Causes include overproduction of urine, low bladder capacity and sleep disturbances. Nocturia increases with age, and is estimated to occur in more than 50 percent of men 45 and older.
  • Fighting prostate cancer with tomato-rich diet

    27 Aug 2014 | 7:02 am
    Men who eat over 10 portions a week of tomatoes have an 18 percent lower risk of developing prostate cancer, new research suggests. With 35,000 new cases every year in the UK, and around 10,000 deaths, prostate cancer is the second most common cancer in men worldwide. Rates are higher in developed countries, which some experts believe is linked to a Westernised diet and lifestyle.
  • Knowledge is power: Men who are uneducated about their prostate cancer have difficulty making good treatment choices

    27 Aug 2014 | 6:01 am
    They say knowledge is power, and a new study has shown this is definitely the case when it comes to men making the best decisions about how to treat their prostate cancer. Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in men aside from skin cancer. An estimated 233,000 new cases of prostate cancer will occur in the United States in 2014. Of those, nearly 30,000 men will die.
  • Recommendations for prostate cancer active surveillance

    26 Aug 2014 | 7:06 am
    Active surveillance offers low-risk prostate cancer patients a means to avoid the potentially harmful side effects from treatment. Pathologists help determine patient eligibility for active surveillance and today a multi-specialty team published their recommendations for making such determinations in a special on-line posting from the Archives of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine.
  • RNA sequence could help doctors to tailor unique prostate cancer treatment programs

    26 Aug 2014 | 6:10 am
    Sequencing RNA, not just DNA, could help doctors predict how prostate cancer tumors will respond to treatment, according to research. Because a tumor's RNA shows the real time changes a treatment is causing, the authors think this could be a useful tool to aid diagnosis and predict which treatment will most benefit individual cancer patients.
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    Lung Cancer News -- ScienceDaily

  • Potential method to better control lung cancer using radiotherapy

    28 Aug 2014 | 6:12 am
    Standard treatment for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer is a combination of radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Traditionally this is planned in a one-size-fits-all manner but the radiation dose may not always be enough to stop tumor growth. The potential to increase the radiation dose to the cancerous tissue varies between patients and depends on the size and location of the tumor. Now researchers have looked at ways to personalize and increase the dose to the tumor while minimizing the effect on healthy tissue. 
  • Three-quarters of depressed cancer patients do not receive treatment for depression; new approach could transform care

    27 Aug 2014 | 5:36 pm
    Three papers reveal that around three-quarters of cancer patients who have major depression are not currently receiving treatment for depression, and that a new integrated treatment program is strikingly more effective at reducing depression and improving quality of life than current care.
  • Novel oncogenic RET mutation found in small cell lung cancer

    23 Aug 2014 | 6:43 am
    For the first time, an oncogenic somatic mutation at amino acid 918 in the rearranged during transfection protein has been identified in small cell lung cancer tumors and enforced expression of this mutation within small cell lung cancer tumor cell lines produced increased intracellular signaling and cell growth.
  • Deletion predicts survival in advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    23 Aug 2014 | 6:43 am
    Bcl-2-like protein 11 deletion in advanced non-small cell lung cancer is associated with shorter progression free survival in epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor or chemotherapy treated Asian patients. Also, Bcl-2-like protein 11 deletion independently predicts overall survival of advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients.
  • Previous pulmonary disease linked to increased lung cancer risk in large study

    15 Aug 2014 | 7:20 am
    Links between a number of common respiratory diseases and an increased risk of developing lung cancer have been found in a large pooled analysis of seven studies involving more than 25,000 individuals. "The variations in the associations between lung cancer and different patterns of previous respiratory diseases that we observed in our study may indicate differences in the underlying etiological mechanisms," said the lead author. "Better understanding of these associations may help guide the type and frequency of clinical surveillance needed for patients with each of these diseases."
 
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    my Breast Cancer blog

  • Why I Posted a Skin Selfie

    Jacki
    2 Sep 2014 | 9:00 am
    My intention today was NOT to post a no-make-up selfie (or any selfie at all, really) on Facebook, but I did because these photos tell a story of a girl who did not listen her to wise grandma when she warned of the dangers of tanning, a girl who cried her mascara off this morning […]
  • And the Survey Says . . .

    Jacki
    30 Aug 2014 | 1:25 pm
    Yesterday, I featured a poll asking, “Which one is the wig?” The results are in. And the answer is: The wig is shown in the bottom image. Thank you for playing!
  • Hair It Is

    Jacki
    29 Aug 2014 | 9:34 am
    I knew the day my nurse walked into my exam room post-lumpectomy and pathology with wig catalogue in hand that I would receive chemo for breast cancer. I was devastated. DEVASTATED. But I managed to survive baldness for the few months it lasted because I found a wig that kind of tricked people into thinking […]
  • I Will Not Fix Everything in 2014

    Jacki
    1 Jan 2014 | 9:32 pm
    I wrote this yesterday. It published on the Huffington Post Healthy Living blog today. I Will Not Fix Everything in 2014
  • NINE Years, NINE Days

    Jacki
    2 Dec 2013 | 7:13 pm
    There are so many milestone days on a cancer journey—diagnosis day, surgery day, start-of-treatment day, end-of-treatment day, and so on. Diagnosis day (November 24) is a biggie for me, but surgery day is pretty powerful, too, because it is the day cancer was officially NOT in my body. That day (NINE years ago) is tomorrow, […]
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    Colon Cancer News -- ScienceDaily

  • Drug shows promise for subset of stage III colon cancer patients

    28 Aug 2014 | 8:08 am
    A subset of patients with stage III colon cancer had improved survival rates when treated with irinotecan-based therapy, according to a new study. When added to the standard chemotherapy treatment -- fluorouracil and leucovorin -- adjuvant irinotecan therapy improved overall survival rates for patients with the CpG island methylator phenotype.
  • Long-term colorectal-cancer mortality after adenoma removal

    28 Aug 2014 | 6:01 am
    Patients with intestinal polyps have a lower risk of dying from cancer than previously thought, according to researchers. Their study is the world’s largest of its kind.
  • Cancer leaves common fingerprint on DNA

    26 Aug 2014 | 6:10 am
    Regardless of their stage or type, cancers appear to share a telltale signature of widespread changes to the so-called epigenome, according to a team of researchers. In a study, the investigators say they have found widespread and distinctive changes in a broad variety of cancers to chemical marks known as methyl groups attached to DNA, which help govern whether genes are turned 'on' or 'off.'
  • Ovarian cancer: Know your body, know your risk

    25 Aug 2014 | 3:53 pm
    Ovarian cancer is the fourth leading cause of death in American women, with about 22,000 diagnosed and 14,000 dying from the disease each year. September is Ovarian Cancer Awareness month and experts are sharing tips on prevention.
  • Cellular biology of colorectal cancer: New Insight

    21 Aug 2014 | 7:24 am
    A new role for the protein adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) in suppressing colorectal cancer -- the second-leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the U.S. -- has been outlined by new research, providing a better understanding of the illness. "It's not widely appreciated, but there is still plenty of cell growth going on in adults, with the colon being a good example," a researcher said. "On average, we shed and replace about 70 pounds of intestinal tissue annually, so you can imagine that this process requires exquisite control to prevent tumor formation."
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    EurekAlert! - Cancer

  • New method for non-invasive prostate cancer screening

    1 Sep 2014 | 9:00 pm
    (American Institute of Physics) A team of researchers led by Shaoxin Li at Guangdong Medical College in China has demonstrated the potential of a new, non-invasive method to screen for prostate cancer, a common type of cancer in men worldwide. They describe their laboratory success testing an existing spectroscopy technique called surface-enhanced Raman scattering with a new, sophisticated analysis technique called support vector machine.
  • Increase seen in use of double mastectomy

    1 Sep 2014 | 9:00 pm
    (The JAMA Network Journals) Among women diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer in California, the percentage undergoing a double mastectomy increased substantially between 1998 and 2011, although this procedure was not associated with a lower risk of death than breast-conserving surgery plus radiation, according to a study in the Sept. 3 issue of JAMA. The authors did find that surgery for the removal of one breast was associated with a higher risk of death than the other options examined in the study.
  • Latest ear, nose, throat, head and neck research to be presented Sept. 21-24

    1 Sep 2014 | 9:00 pm
    (American Academy of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery) The latest research on sleep apnea, tonsillectomies, hearing loss, head and neck cancers and other otolaryngic topics will be presented in Orlando, FL, September 21-24, at the 2014 Annual Meeting & OTO EXPO℠ of the American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation.
  • Sabotage as therapy: Aiming lupus antibodies at vulnerable cancer cells

    1 Sep 2014 | 9:00 pm
    (Yale University) Yale Cancer Center researchers may have discovered a new way of harnessing lupus antibodies to sabotage cancer cells made vulnerable by deficient DNA repair.The study, led by James E. Hansen, M.D., assistant professor of therapeutic radiology at Yale School of Medicine, found that cancer cells with deficient DNA repair mechanisms (or the inability to repair their own genetic damage) were significantly more vulnerable to attack by lupus antibodies.
  • Enzyme controlling metastasis of breast cancer identified

    1 Sep 2014 | 9:00 pm
    (University of California - San Diego) Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have identified an enzyme that controls the spread of breast cancer. The findings, reported in the current issue of PNAS, offer hope for the leading cause of breast cancer mortality worldwide. An estimated 40,000 women in America will die of breast cancer in 2014, according to the American Cancer Society.
 
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    Cancer Treatment

  • Trying to scare or educate us?

    Carolines Breast Cancer Blog
    2 Sep 2014 | 4:25 am
    I like these little articles found all over the internet: "signs of  [insert disease name here]". I just found one this morning for signs of oral cancer.read more
  • 55 Days and an Eternity to go ....

    Southern Hoffs
    1 Sep 2014 | 11:30 am
    It has been 55 days since Don passed away.  I promise you that I am not mentally keeping a daily count of the days, but I do look it up from time to time.&nbread more
  • Living with medical errors

    Carolines Breast Cancer Blog
    1 Sep 2014 | 7:41 am
    I have a picture some place of when I went for knee surgery in 2001 of me home from the hospital with a big bandage on my right knee and the word "NO" scrawled in big letters on  my right knee. This was written by the surgeon after triple confirming with me.read more
  • Back to reality

    Carolines Breast Cancer Blog
    31 Aug 2014 | 4:51 am
    While we are back from vacation, I am trying to stretch out the relaxed feeling for a few more days - until I go back to work Tuesday morning.What is reality?read more
  • Pear and Jicama Salsa from Dana Jacobi and the AICR

    Ross Bonander
    29 Aug 2014 | 3:35 pm
    The American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) supports research on the relationship of nutrition, physical activity and weight management to cancer risk. They interpret the scientific literature and educate the public about those risks. Each week, the AICR also publishes a carefully prepared recipe for a dish designed to encourage healthier lifestyle choices among the public. This week's dish is a pear and jicama salsa. Jacobi writes: read more
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    cancerhawk

  • What You Need to Know About Breast Reconstruction

    Robyn
    1 Sep 2014 | 6:32 am
    The Cancer Support Community surveyed 762 breast cancer survivors (who were eligible for breast reconstruction) and found that 43% of these women did not receive any info about breast reconstruction PRIOR to making surgical decisions (mastectomy or lumpectomy). Why is this a huge problem? Well, if you opt to reconstruct one or both boobs, the method you choose to reconstruct can be affected depending on how the initial surgery is done. Since you can’t go back and re-do your mastectomy, this is an extremely important conversation to have with your doctor BEFORE a mastectomy takes place.
  • Fight Cancer & WIN! With This Kick-Ass Cancer Fighting Video Game

    Robyn
    24 Aug 2014 | 6:58 pm
      Any oncologist or parent will tell you that getting young cancer patients (that includes children, teenagers and even young adults) to stick to their treatment regimens and take their medications when and how they have been prescribed is no easy task.  To help encourage treatment adherence (which improves outcomes and saves lives!), researchers at HopeLab created  Re-Mission2,a series of six very cool, FREE video games that are super fun to play, a tad bit addicting ;-) AND help it’s players beat a diagnosis of cancer.   Here’s how it works:  …
  • When to Buy Organic: 2014 Dirty Dozen & Clean 15

    Robyn
    22 Aug 2014 | 1:20 pm
    Many people believe that the pesticides used to grow conventional or non-organic produce may have played a role in their cancer and that removing pesticides from our food may help re-build and strengthen their bodies.  Although there is no definitive research proving either belief, should we avoid buying some or all fruits or vegetables that are conventionally grown?     To help answer this question, the Environmental Working Group (EWG), thenation’s leading environmental health research and advocacy organization, created theShopper’s Guide to Pesticides in Produce.
  • Nutritional Fixes for Common Cancer Side Effects

    Robyn
    17 Aug 2014 | 7:54 pm
    Super helpful info from Cancer Treatment Centers of America… To learn about fixes for these and other common cancer side effects, check out Cancer Nutrition & Recipes for Dummies. Click HERE for more on nutrition therapy, tips & recipes from Cancer Treatment Centers of America Dieticians.   http://ctcaho.pe/CancerNutritionAndRecipesForDummies
  • When It Comes to Cancer, Unknown is Unacceptable…

    Robyn
    14 Aug 2014 | 8:53 am
    Molecular profiling, biomarker testing and targeted therapies are changing the way physicians treat cancer patients.  In the not-too-distant future, experts agree that cancer will be defined and treated based on each person’s unique molecular profile and biomarkers rather than the body part where it first originated.  Until this happens, oncologists must rely on knowing the part of the body where the cancer started (known as the primary site) to guide their treatment plans.   So what happens when a person is diagnosed with cancer and doctors do not know it’s primary…
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    Cancerwise | Cancer blog from MD Anderson Cancer Center

  • How an art project gave our patients hope and a community

    Cancerwise Blogger
    2 Sep 2014 | 5:30 am
    By Ian CionFor the past five months, I've been working with more than 1,300 patients, family members, and staff at MD Anderson to create a monumental scale river dragon sculpture entitled Okoa the Wave Rider. The sculpture, a project made possible by the Arts in Medicine Program, was built entirely on site in the Main Building. You may have seen it on display, or maybe even contributed to it, in The Park. The name, "Okoa," was selected through a vote by the patients and families who helped create the dragon. It's a Swahili word that means "rescue, save, redeem or deliver."It's a fitting name,…
  • How marathon running helped me through my CLL treatment

    Cancerwise Blogger
    28 Aug 2014 | 5:30 am
    By Alex Magdaleno When I was diagnosed with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) in December 2008, I thought my life as I knew it was over. I thought it was not only a death sentence, but I also feared my love for exercise would cease. I had always been active. I lifted weights and played football. But when I received my CLL diagnosis at age 25, I decided to take up marathon running to prove to myself that I could do it in spite of my cancer. Although it's been a challenge, I believe marathon running has helped keep me alive. Marathon training during CLL treatmentSince my CLL diagnosis, I've…
  • Kyssi Andrews' three lessons on coping with hair loss

    Kellie Bramlet
    27 Aug 2014 | 5:30 am
    For 5-year-old Khyrstin Andrews, better known as Kyssi, and her mom, Marla, it was just as tough when Kyssi lost her hair the third time as it was the first. In 2012, Kyssi was diagnosed with a Wilms' Tumor, a type of childhood cancer that affects the kidneys. After undergoing chemotherapy and radiation, she was declared cancer-free. But not long after that, her Wilms' Tumor returned and metastasized to her lungs. She underwent a surgery and an intense type of chemotherapy called ICE (a combination of ifosfamide, carboplatin and etoposide). In January 2014, Kyssi was declared cancer-free once…
  • What you should know about bladder cancer

    Laura Nathan-Garner
    26 Aug 2014 | 5:30 am
    This year, nearly 75,000 people will be diagnosed with bladder cancer, according to the American Cancer Society. The vast majority of people diagnosed with this disease are white men over age 55, but bladder cancer can -- and does -- affect men and women of all ages and races. For many, blood in the urine will be the first tell-tale bladder cancer symptom. But many patients don't come to MD Anderson until their disease is late-stage and the bladder cancer has spread. And that, says, Arlene Siefker-Radtke, M.D., associate professor in Genitourinary Medical Oncology, can make it harder to…
  • How we help cancer caregivers

    Cancerwise Blogger
    25 Aug 2014 | 5:30 am
    By Lindsey GarnerWhen our patients undergo treatment, the focus is on them and their needs. But cancer often affects the entire family, especially caregivers. To help, we have employees and programs that provide support to those who care for cancer patients."I've made a special effort in my role to acknowledge caregivers and how tough it can be to take care of somebody you love," Traci Newsom says.A social work counselor at MD Anderson in the Bay Area, Newsom serves as an outlet for caregivers to share their feelings and the challenges they face.Caregivers often neglect their own needs when a…
 
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    Mesothelioma News Center | Latest in Asbestos & Mesothelioma News

  • Deadly Mr. Fluffy Asbestos Products Are Still Affecting Australians

    Lorraine Kember
    29 Aug 2014 | 11:50 am
    Despite a national cleanup effort two decades ago to eliminate the notorious Mr. Fluffy-brand asbestos products from homes in Australia, new evidence shows more than a thousand of those homes still are toxic. Australian Capital Territory (ACT) government officials recently discovered that homes in Canberra, previously deemed safe after asbestos removal programs in the 1980s, still contained asbestos fibers in the walls, under the houses and inside living spaces. Exposure to asbestos is linked to the development of mesothelioma and other serious and potentially fatal respiratory diseases and…
  • Carboplatin Remains the Best Chemotherapy Drug for HIPEC Procedure

    Tim Povtak
    27 Aug 2014 | 8:06 am
    Surgeon Brian Loggie, M.D., hopes to end the continued debate over which chemotherapy agent is the best to use during the HIPEC procedure that he helped pioneer for peritoneal mesothelioma patients. There is no doubt in his mind: Carboplatin. The American Surgeon recently published a retrospective study in which Loggie and his colleagues at the Creighton University Medical Center concluded that carboplatin clearly was more effective than mitomycin, which several cancer centers are using. The HIPEC (Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy) procedure involves the internal rinsing or bathing…
  • Clinical Trial Will Test if Vaccine Can Prevent, Delay Cancer Recurrence

    Tim Povtak
    20 Aug 2014 | 11:57 am
    Researchers hope the vaccine they soon will begin testing in humans will prevent or delay the recurrence of some cancers. Patients with pleural mesothelioma will be among the first to receive the H1299 lysate vaccine with an Iscomatrix adjuvant. The vaccine is a form of immunotherapy designed to trigger the body's immune system into preventing new cancer growth. The National Institutes of Health(NIH) will begin conducting the three-year trial in September. It's designed for patients whom recently completed standard treatments, including surgery, chemotherapy or radiation, and whom have little…
  • Early Palliative Care Can Lessen Hospital Stays, Improve Well-Being

    Tim Povtak
    11 Aug 2014 | 3:28 pm
    It is never too early for a patient diagnosed with mesothelioma — or most any cancer — to start consulting with a palliative care specialist, according to a recent study. The message from researchers at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston: The sooner, the better. Results from the study show early palliative care referrals and outpatient referrals were associated with fewer hospitalizations, emergency room visits, intensive-care admissions and hospital deaths compared to those on an inpatient basis. Palliative care focuses on pain relief, symptom reduction and…
  • Simple Blood Test Using UV Light Could Detect Cancer

    Tim Povtak
    6 Aug 2014 | 8:04 am
    A new blood test that exposes a person's blood to ultraviolet light could help doctors in the early detection of cancer. Varying intensities of UV light cause different amounts of damage to the DNA of white blood cells. British researchers say their Lymphocyte Genome Sensitivity (LGS) blood test measures that degree of damage to distinguish between healthy, precancerous and cancerous cells. The blood test could be helpful in the early discovery of cancers difficult to detect like pleural mesothelioma. It also could help patients access treatments earlier, and save money on costly invasive…
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    Mesothelioma Cancer Alliance Blog

  • Advocate of the Month - September 2014

    Staff
    1 Sep 2014 | 9:00 pm
    The Mesothelioma Cancer Alliance would like to thank Hana Haatainen-Caye for contributing as our September Advocate of the Month. Hana is a writer, speaker, and voice-over talent who spreads her passion for green living on her blog Green Grandma. Today, she shares her story of how asbestos and mesothelioma have played a part in her life. Read and share her story below:I grew up less than two blocks away from an asbestos plant in Manheim, PA. I don’t know what the actual name of the company was in my early years, we just referred to it as “The Asbestos.” My mom worked in the office…
  • Combating Chemotherapy's Side Effects With Nutrition

    Jennifer Lucarelli
    25 Aug 2014 | 9:00 pm
    Many mesothelioma patients choose to undergo chemotherapy as part of their cancer treatment. Unfortunately, chemotherapy may cause loss of appetite, nausea, sore mouths, and fatigue; often, chemotherapy leads to weight loss. While many patients find it difficult to eat before and after chemotherapy treatments, nutritious food can be a powerful tool that mesothelioma patients may use to combat cancer and the side-effects of chemotherapy. Rebecca Katz, author of The Cancer-Fighting Kitchen and One Bite at a Time cookbooks, provides cancer patients and their families with nutritious, wholesome…
  • Can a Popular Mesothelioma Chemotherapy Treatment Cause Kidney Damage?

    Staff
    24 Aug 2014 | 9:00 pm
    For mesothelioma patients, a number of factors come into play when trying to determine what treatment options will be most effective. For patients who choose to undergo chemotherapy treatments, the commonly used combination of pemetrexed and cisplatin is shown to have potentially harmful effects on a patient's kidneys.When mesothelioma patients are treated with the anti-folate anti-cancer agent, pemetrexed, and cisplatin, most patients are instructed to supplement with folic acid and vitamin B12 which can reduce some of pemetrexed’s side effects.1,2 About 1 in 3 patients (35%) treated with…
  • Photodynamic Light Therapy as a Potential Mesothelioma Treatment

    Staff
    10 Aug 2014 | 9:00 pm
    For mesothelioma patients, there is a potential new treatment option involving photodynamic therapy.What is photodynamic therapy?Photodynamic therapy uses a laser that produces light at a specific wavelength and a chemical called a photosensitizing agent in a three step process:(1) patients are given a photosensitizing chemical that makes cells very sensitive to light, such as photofrin®, Levulan®, Metvixia®;(2) their cells take it up within hours (4-72 hours, usually) and become sensitive to light; and(3) a physician shines a special laser on the tumor nodule, the chosen wavelength of…
  • The Importance of Support for Cancer Patients

    Heather Von St. James
    6 Aug 2014 | 9:00 pm
    When I was diagnosed with mesothelioma, I felt more isolated than I ever had in my life.. I was a mere 36 years young and told I had an incredibly rare cancer that, in most cases, was diagnosed in much older men. I felt utterly alone and defeated.Eight years ago, information on the Internet about mesothelioma was scarce, and everything I did read was so scary that I stopped looking. At that time, Facebook was still private, and any other resource I found never mentioned mesothelioma. I felt like no one knew what I was going through. Even my own doctor had never heard of a female getting…
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  • Common Summer Illnesses You Need to Avoid (Part 2)

    Fredda Branyon
    27 Aug 2014 | 12:52 am
    Common Summer Illnesses You Need to Avoid (Part 2) Source:penn-bariatric It’s amazing how you can never run out of things to do during summer. From long walks in the park to playing frisbee on the beach with your friends and family, summer is definitely time to enjoy the outdoors. However, there are health issues that you need to be aware of before you go frolicking under the sun. You may have read the first part of this blog post, so here’s the continuation.   Source:omaha Fireworks Injuries – July is the United States’ Independence Day, and an average of 200 are rushed to…
  • Common Summer Illnesses You Need to Avoid (Part 1)

    Fredda Branyon
    20 Aug 2014 | 12:46 am
    Common Summer Illnesses You Need to Avoid (Part 1) Source:crystalgraphics Barbecues in the yard and long walks on the beach are summer activities that everyone partakes in and loves. However, people do not just have good memories of summer, they have bad ones too, especially when they develop common summer illnesses in the midst of the fun they are having. So here’s a straightforward guide on the common summer illnesses and information on how you can prevent them.   Recreational Water Illnesses (RWI) – These types of illnesses have doubled over the last two decades, so the risks…
  • August is National Immunization Awareness Month (Part 2)

    Fredda Branyon
    13 Aug 2014 | 9:19 pm
    Source: blog.roseman.edu According to the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, immunizations are one of the top ten public health accomplishments of the 20th century. This is because it has helped save millions of lives since its inception. Now it has been decided that the month of August be dedicated to celebrating the National Immunization Awareness Month. In the previous article, we have discussed the first of the four weekly themes that have been set for August. Here is the second to the fourth weekly themes. August 10 to 16: Back to School People can focus on a…
  • August is National Immunization Awareness Month (Part 1)

    Fredda Branyon
    6 Aug 2014 | 7:44 pm
    Source: online.mph.ufl.edu This August, medical institutions and nonprofit organizations, along with other sectors of society, are celebrating the National Immunization Awareness Month (NIAM). The purpose of promoting immunization among Americans is to remind them of the benefits that immunization brings to people regardless of their age. All the activities are geared towards encouraging individuals and their families to protect their health by getting immunization against various infectious and lethal diseases. For 2014, it is the National Public Health Information Coalition that is…
  • Gluten-Free Food May Not Be as Healthy as You Think

    Fredda Branyon
    30 Jul 2014 | 7:30 pm
    Source: u.osu.edu Oftentimes, food labels on the shelves of our favorite convenience stores and supermarkets can influence our perception of how we look at and select products. Terms like “natural,” “wholegrain,” “antioxidant,” and “gluten-free” have led customers into thinking they are choosing healthier food because they have an implied health benefit. While it is great that a good number of consumers have become more aware of the need to consider healthier options, a recently published study in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior has reported that people who…
 
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